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С юбилеем? (for 'dating') дружок? ('boyfriend')

Discussion in 'Русский (Russian)' started by BoozeBaron, Jan 30, 2013.

  1. BoozeBaron

    BoozeBaron New Member

    London, UK
    English - American
    Apologies for writing in English, am fairly new to all this and tried to search on this topic, and am coming up blank (or if anyone knows of an existing thread, mod/others, please feel free to point me in the right direction).

    That said, I'm dating a UA lady (with Russian roots) - and 2 topics/themes have surfaced recently. For whatever reason, she's *big* on marking our monthly 'anniversaries' ... and so, every 30th of a month (erm, today!) I send her a little card of congratulations... All this time now though (6 months) I've been researching either in Russian or Ukrainian, how to say (what we say here in the USA) i.e. "Happy 6 month anniversary"... to no avail... as it seems "С юбилеем" is pretty much reserved for 'proper' anniversaries (weddings, marriages, etc.) ... So, what does one say in Russian/Ukrainian to convey this message, without making it sound all formal like a wedding anniversary?

    I know the rules say not to ask more than 1 question... but this is kinda related... (mods, feel free to delete or remove if improper) ...

    (#2) The term "boyfriend" is tied into this obviously - and have also done allot of research online regarding this... But seems there's really no 'equal' in Russian.... or, the ones I do find, are 'too strong' (indicating we are lovers, sexually involved (sorry if offensive to anyone, not meant to be)). -or- it translates watered down, simply as 'friend' or 'mate'... which we are more than...

    How does a male, who is now (per her words) "her boyfriend" say that in Russian/Ukrainian, without crossing any lines (being too 'connected' sexually) or conversely, too little, by just being a 'mate'/'friend'/'pal'?? e.g. возлюбленный vs. дружок.

    I'd like to sign off our talks and letters sometimes with a proper "with love, your boyfriend" type comment.... but am fearful of using the wrong term ...

    Confused! :(

    Many thanks for any advice in advance -

    Cheers,

    BB
     
  2. Maroseika Moderator

    Moscow
    Russian
    1. Юбилей can be used in all cases, not only marriage, birthday, etc. The only problem is that юбилей presumes at least annual anniversary, but not monthly.
    So I'd suggest just поздравляю с 30-м числом, because you both know what it means for you. Or поздравляю с нашим днем.
    If she is good in Russian you may even play with the word годовщина > месячина. Actually this word means monthly wages, but this meaning is archaic and it's real sense in your case must be quite evident.

    2. Парень, девушка (like in это моя девушка, он мой парень). Some time ago (15 or maybe 25 years ago) this term didn't implies sexual relations, but now it usually does.
    Возлюбленный is too lofty, дружок is too bookish.
    English loan бойфренд is also used sometimes (but not герлфренд).
     
  3. BoozeBaron

    BoozeBaron New Member

    London, UK
    English - American
    Many thanks Maroseika...

    RE: #1 - Given what you've shared, I think поздравляю с нашим днем would be most appropriate and will try that - thank you :)

    RE: #2 - You've expressed the same 'problem' that others have shared when us English-speaking natives try to suss out a proper word to use... You've also said, as have others, (and my original post) that today, it now implies sexual relations, which, I do not wish to infer or imply towards her (or offend her) ...

    I've taken your example of: Парень, девушка (like in это моя девушка, он мой парень) and am trying to break it apart to see if it's usable in our circumstances...

    I sincerely appreciate your help and ideas -

    I'd welcome any other thoughts on #2 ... :)

    Thanks,

    BB

    PS: Argh - I think you snuck in another option for #2 whilst I was typing (or I didn't see it?) - Either way, you are exactly echoing what others have said ... "Too bookish", too lofty" etc. etc. etc... There must be a casual relaxed way to say this, without the sexual context added?

    I've yet to research "бойфренд" - but may be a solution... Cheers
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2013
  4. BoozeBaron

    BoozeBaron New Member

    London, UK
    English - American
    "бойфренд" does seem to tick all the boxes :) excellent!
     
  5. Maroseika Moderator

    Moscow
    Russian
    Это ее молодой человек is even more polite than ее парень or бойфренд. In fact, парень or молодой человек do not imply sexual relations on 100%, it depends on the people you are talking about. And I don't see any offensive here. Quite neutral.
    But бойфренд implies sex for sure.
     
  6. BoozeBaron

    BoozeBaron New Member

    London, UK
    English - American
    Hmmm - OK - My mistake...

    I misunderstood what you said here: "English loan бойфренд is also used sometimes (but not герлфренд)."

    I read that as "бойфренд" was common (and may very well be today) - but didn't imply sexual relations... and that "герлфренд" was a 'no-no' and not to say....

    I'll have to break apart your other suggestions...

    Thanks, again...

    BB
     
  7. Maroseika Moderator

    Moscow
    Russian
    I meant гёрлфренд is too alien for Russian phonetically and sound bad, that is probably why it is not used.
     
  8. Olga4652 New Member

    Russia, North
    Russian
    Anniversary – годовщина (even when it’s been only a month), юбилей (when it’s been every period of time divisible by10, like 10, 20, 50).

    We don’t say «юбилей знакомства», we say «годовщина знакомства» instead.
    “Happy 6 month anniversary” in Russian would be «с годовщиной» (since it’s odd to say literally «счастливой шестимесячной годовщины»). In this case you only need to add something like «прошло ровно 6 месяцев, как мы познакомились/начали встречаться» or«сегодня 6 месяцев наших отношений», or such.

    We use the calque from the English “boyfriend” which is «бойфренд», but it’s used colloquially and mostly by the youth.We also have a number of equivalents such as «парень» (also colloquial), «мужчина» (used a lot for males over 30, but is a bit straightforward), «молодой человек» (used for males from teens through the middle-aged and is quite respectful and used formally as well).

    The word «возлюбленный» also can be used for this. But it doesn’t necessarily denote any relationship but just a feeling; it’s also more poetic and literary.

    There’s the word «любимый» which is “darling”, sweetheart.

    Btw, honestly, putting it simply as “you boyfriend” for a letter ending doesn't sound very romantic. I think in English it’d sound better with a simple “Your+ name” which would be a better way to say it in Russian too, I think.

    «Дружок» means “buddy”, “”dude””.

    P.s. We don’t say «месячина» at all.:eek: And «гелфренд» is OK for colloquialism. There’s nothing wrong sincewe also use many foreign words. ;)
     
  9. Maroseika Moderator

    Moscow
    Russian
    In Russian годовщина has only one meaning: календарная дата, день, в который со времени какого-либо события прошел один год или очередной год. Шестимесячная годовщина is an oxymoron, but as such can be used of course, but only jocularly. Othewise it's wrong.
     
  10. BoozeBaron

    BoozeBaron New Member

    London, UK
    English - American
    OK, many thanks to you both... but now I'm confused again (this seems to happen allot) :)

    I need to break apart and re-read everything to see if I understand what you are both saying and proposing..

    @Olga - I do not sign off my letter with simply "your boyfriend" - Currently, I sign off saying "Sending Love, Your MyName"...

    But ever since she TOLD me (verbally) that "You are my boyfriend" .. "I am your girlfriend" - I've been trying to find an English/Russian way to insert that into my signature, so she knows that I remember that (it's more important in USA/UK I suppose?) - But when I see the many different options, the one I certainly wish to steer far from - is anything sexual (implied) ....

    I also understand most of what you said (above) - and am digesting it and trying to figure out what is best for the occasion (be it anniversary, or a simple "sign-off" for my letters) - But to help me understand what you mean better... can you please tell me your definition of "colloquially"?? - I know what it means (phonetically) - and it fits for how you are using it above.. but it still does not help me fully understand how to structure things... So if you could give me another way to structure what I wish to convey - that'd be greatly appreciated.

    Let me soak all this in - and will give more feedback later ...

    Cheers,

    BB


    PS: «месячина» is shown as a landowner or 'slave'? Is this correct? and is that why it's improper to use? I don't recall who suggested it... Thanks either way :))) It's banned from my list now :)))
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2013
  11. Maroseika Moderator

    Moscow
    Russian
    No, месячина is monthly wages landloard paid his serfs (archaic). It's improper just because it doesn't mean what you need, but might be used as a jocular occasionalism in assotiation with годовщина.
    If you are not your addressee will get the word play, better forget it.
     

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