ворсинка

Discussion in 'Русский (Russian)' started by Sniegurochka, Feb 8, 2013.

  1. Sniegurochka

    Sniegurochka Senior Member

    Waco, Texas
    Russian
    What is a technical term for that in English? I mean tiny fibers only seen under microscope or by means of macro photography, the ones that some living organisms develop in order to be in a better touch with the outside. For example, such is the surface of leaves, or the lining of an intestine, that allows for a closer contact with the outside environment and for a better absorption of whatever the organism needs to survive. Would the word "fiber" do it? Or, is there another more technical term? In Russian, ворсинки is the term used in botany for plants, and in anatomy for tissues. I am talking about living organisms that are programmed to live, that will do anything to just hold on to being under the sun, even break through the mud, lift up asphalt, and hold to the last drop of water with each one of their tiny fibers.
     
  2. Raggmopp New Member

    Idaho
    English
    Privet, Sniegurochka: My biological training is years behind me, but I will try to be of service. I would not use fibers in the sense you are seeking, since in anatomical terms "fiber" is typically a relatively large aggregate of smaller units. That is, we speak of nerve fibers and muscle fibers, and in the case of muscle, there is an interaction between the smaller actin and myosin "fibrils." In the intestine, the word is "villus/villi," composed of still smaller "microvilli." In the lungs, fallopian tubes, and inner ears, the word "cilium/cilia" will be understood, although in the ears we typically speak of "hair cells." If we venture into botany and microbiology, plant leaves have cilia, as do micro-invertebrates and bacteria. With regard to the specialized structures used by bacteria to move through their environment, the term is "flagellum/flagella," deriving from the Latin---with a sense of the flagellum moving in a whip-like or propeller-like manner. The above are all generic terms, and specific micro-organisms may have more personalized names for their "fibers." But you will be understood if you use the terms I mentioned above.
     
  3. Sniegurochka

    Sniegurochka Senior Member

    Waco, Texas
    Russian
    Oh wow, thank you for this fabulous explanation! Really helpful!
     

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