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господин vs. мистер

Discussion in 'Русский (Russian)' started by macdevster, Aug 24, 2014.

  1. macdevster

    macdevster Senior Member

    USA, English
    So as of 2014, what is the status with Gospodin as a title with a name? Would an American tourist be introduced as Gospodin Smith? Or Mister Smith?
     
  2. gvozd

    gvozd Senior Member

    That strongly depends on the sircumstances. Can't imagine 'mister' in any though. Господин is very formal. I think in most cases a tourist would be introduced using their first name, John Smith for example.
     
  3. Awwal12 Senior Member

    Moscow, the RF
    Russian
    In my opinion, "мистер" is mostly a historical word, difficult to find anywhere except the Soviet (and earlier) literature.
    "Господин" is in active use, but I must stress that it is used much more seldom than "mister" is used in English.
     
  4. macdevster

    macdevster Senior Member

    USA, English
    As an American teacher of Russian, my students would likely be more comfortable saying Господин Браун. But in many years ago when I taught Russian I had them call me by my first name and patronymic, which was very uncomfortable for them at first but they kinda got a kick out of it (especially when introducing me to their parents, for example). So which do you think would be more appropriate?
     
  5. Awwal12 Senior Member

    Moscow, the RF
    Russian
    Name+Patronymic is a standard and most used form of polite adressing or reference. In fact, it's difficult to imagine the situations where "господин"+surname would be preferable compared to it. But since foreigners mostly just don't have patronymics, it could be the case. At least to me something like "Барак Баракович (Обама)" would sound pretty weird.
     
  6. gvozd

    gvozd Senior Member

    What is a patronym for an English speaker?
     
  7. macdevster

    macdevster Senior Member

    USA, English
    I always went by Диван Иосифович, which I know sounds really strange. Nickname from undergrad.
     

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