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оставить кого-то в каком-то месте

Discussion in 'Русский (Russian)' started by moonlight7, Feb 24, 2013.

  1. moonlight7 Senior Member

    Hi,
    I have doubts about the translation of this sentence into English:
    Многие знакомые корили Мастера за то, что он оставил в своём доме больную девочку.
    My intent is
    "Many acquaintances reproached the Master for the fact that he left a sick girl in his house"
    Или:
    "Many acquaintances reproached the Master for the fact that he allowed a
    sick girl to stay in his house".
     
  2. Enquiring Mind Senior Member

    UK/Česká republika
    English - the Queen's
    Hi moonlight7. I think it's your first version. I don't think оставить can mean "allow someone to stay", but no doubt the natives will correct me if I'm wrong.

    More neatly, you could say "... reproached the Master for leaving a/the sick girl ...". It doesn't matter if you say "leaving" or "having left". "Leaving" is shorter and more idiomatic.

    Depending on the context, I think it could also mean "for keeping the sick girl at home", in other words, for not taking her to the doctor, for example. But I don't think the "allow" sense is possible.
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2013
  3. moonlight7 Senior Member

    Thanks, Enquiring Mind! One of my friends (a Russian) suggested using "stay" in this case. But I know that "stay" means "оставаться", but not "оставлять".

    His sentence was: "Many acquaintances reproached the Master for the fact that he stayed a sick girl in his house" or "Many acquaintances reproached the Master for what he stayed a sick girl at his home".

    Adding more context: a girl was lame and she was abandoned by her mother, so the Master left her to live in his house.
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2013
  4. Enquiring Mind Senior Member

    UK/Česká republika
    English - the Queen's
    "Stay" isn't possible, as the verb is almost always intransitive, in other words, it cannot take an object.

    I haven't got the rest of the context, but it sounds as if it means "for keeping her at home" or "for making her stay at home" (they both mean the same).
     
  5. moonlight7 Senior Member

  6. igusarov

    igusarov Senior Member

    Moscow, Russia
    Russian
    "Оставить" is very close to English "leave". But depending on the context it could mean either "leave behind" or "leave as it is". I've googled for the source sentence. It appear to be taken from an Islamic story for the children. The story is about a Master and a disabled girl. Girl's mother has brought her to the Master and challenged him to either heal her or take her, because she (the mother) is so exhausted and cannot endure caring for this disabled girl any more. So the Master let the girl live with him.

    Here, the girl has been brought to the Master's. She's already at his house, and the Master let her stay there. In other words he left her where she already is. He didn't kick her away.
     
  7. Enquiring Mind Senior Member

    UK/Česká republika
    English - the Queen's
    Он внимательно посмотрел на девочку, затем поднял глаза на женщину:
    — Ты в самом деле хочешь оставить её Мне? Если данное тебе Богом дитя в тягость тебе… — что же, Я согласен. Только и ты не пожалей потом!…
    * * *
    Многие знакомые корили Мастера за то, что Он оставил в Своём доме больную девочку: «Что подумают о Тебе те, кто захотят у Тебя учиться?! Они решат, что Ты — плохой целитель и не настоящий Мастер, если калека живёт у Тебя в доме!»

    Well now I have to eat humble pie (translation here on dictionarist.com), because in this specific context, you can say "for allowing her to stay in his house" or "for keeping her in his house", or igusarov's excellent "for letting her stay with him", and my earlier suggestion of "making her stay ..." is no good. It's clear that he wasn't forcing her to stay, it was an act of kindness.

    As we see, context is everything. :)
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2013
  8. moonlight7 Senior Member

    Great thanks, Enquiring Mind and igusarov!
     

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