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القردة المحترفون للتقليد

Discussion in 'العربية (Arabic)' started by Huda, Mar 22, 2013.

  1. Huda Senior Member

    arabic-Egypt
    would you please help me translate the following underlined sentence:

    فهل يجوز لأي منا أن يردد هذه المقولات كالببغاوات، ويسير في طريق التقليد لهذه المواريث الغربية وردود أفعالها، كما يصنع القردة المحترفون للتقليد؟!.
     
  2. shafaq Senior Member

    Istanbul
    Turkish
    "... like the pro mimic apes do." may fits there.
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2013
  3. Huda Senior Member

    arabic-Egypt
    what's meant by pro mimic? It's the first time I've seen this expression.
     
  4. shafaq Senior Member

    Istanbul
    Turkish
    مقـلّد محترف
    كثيرالتقليد
    مُفْرط فى التقليد
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2013
  5. Huda Senior Member

    arabic-Egypt
    ]

    Thank you. One more question: Are you sure that "pro mimic apes" would mean القردة المحترفون للتقليد ?
     
  6. Absconditus New Member

    Bulgarian, Arabic
    شخصيّاً مارح استخدم pro mimic
    professional/unoriginal imitators/apers
    إلا إذا بدك ترجمة أكثر حرفيّة
    as do those professional imitators, who are incapable of originality
    as do those professional imitators, who, like machines/automata, are incapable of originality
     
  7. shafaq Senior Member

    Istanbul
    Turkish
    I think it is just one of the ways expressing it.
     
  8. jack_1313 Senior Member

    English - Australian
    It's the first time I've heard it too. If I read that in a text, I wouldn't have a clue what it meant.

    Maybe the best way to translate the author's meaning would be "like apes, which are experts in imitation" or "like apes, which are skilled in immitation"? I didn't know that apes were known for their skills in mimicking :S

    PS: why has the author used the sound masculine plural (محترفون) here?
     
  9. abdulwahid Senior Member

    Nordic
    The sound masculine plural is used here describing the apes because the apes represent humans. Looking at the words only it should be muhtarifah, but considering the meaning it would be ok to use muhtarifun.
     
  10. إسكندراني

    إسكندراني Senior Member

    أرض الأنجل
    عربي (مصر)ـ | en (gb)
    محترفون is a mistake, and a commonly made one.
    And I'm with jack's suggestions.
     
  11. Tracer

    Tracer Senior Member

    Wadi Jinn
    American English
    القردة المحترفون للتقليد =

    ....that are master mimics.
    ....that are adroit mimics.
    ....that are virtuoso mimics.

    OR

    ....that are master imitators
    ....that are skillful imitators........etc

    (In both folklore and science, apes and monkeys have long been seen as master imitators. See http://www.sciencemag.org/content/325/5942/824.summary )

    Also note the very common English parable: "Monkey see, monkey do"
     
  12. إسكندراني

    إسكندراني Senior Member

    أرض الأنجل
    عربي (مصر)ـ | en (gb)
    I still think words like 'adroit' and 'virtuoso' are too weird.
     
  13. Tracer

    Tracer Senior Member

    Wadi Jinn
    American English
    I agree that "virtuoso" and "adroit" are inappropriate here. A primate may be adroit at climbing, but not necessarily so at mimicing, (although "adroit" wouldn't be necessarily "wrong".....it's just not the best word available). This is actually true of ALL the words suggested so far above.

    Fact of the matter is that if the passage provided by the OP above were originally an English text, what the writer would have written would be the following:

    ...that are clever mimics.

    "Clever" is the only adjective that sounds "natural" to a native English speaker in this instance/context and therefore that's what he would use. Those translators that are "strict reconstructionists" (stick to the original text as much as possible) however, would of course, disagree.
     
  14. Huda Senior Member

    arabic-Egypt
     
  15. Huda Senior Member

    arabic-Egypt
    what if I want to use this parable? would you please contextualize it?
     
  16. Tracer

    Tracer Senior Member

    Wadi Jinn
    American English
    Well, what I'm saying is if you use the word APES (or monkeys or primates) and you want to suggest that they are very good MIMICS, the best adjective to use would be CLEVER.

    How exactly you want to translate your original Arabic sentence into English and which syntactic approaches you would take is another matter entirely.
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2013
  17. Tracer

    Tracer Senior Member

    Wadi Jinn
    American English
    I'm not 100% sure what you mean by "contextualize" here, but I assume you want an example of how it's used.

    MOTHER: Why did you hit the cat?

    TOM: Because DICK (older brother) hit him.

    MOTHER: So it's Monkey See, Monkey Do with you? Do you have to do everything DICK does? What if he jumps out of a window? Are you going to do that too?
    (So you're a copy-cat?)
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2013
  18. Huda Senior Member

    arabic-Egypt
    Thank you all. Special thanks to Tracer
     

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