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بيت (home, verse)

Discussion in 'العربية (Arabic)' started by Plastech, Nov 30, 2005.

  1. Plastech New Member

    English - United States
    I think I heard somewhere that the Arabic word for home is the same as the arabic word for verse? Is this true? If so, what is the transliteration (roughly) of that word? I would really love to use that fact in an essay I'm writing. Thanks in advance.
     
  2. alahay

    alahay Senior Member

    US
    Phoenicia
    The arabic word for verse is: AYA
    The arabic word for home is: BAYT

    Sorry, I could't find anything that could meet your similarity expectation.
     
  3. Plastech New Member

    English - United States
    Weird, I'm pretty sure I heard it in a documentary on Mahmed Darwish. So bayt doesn't have any other meanings? It might not have been verse, but I am positive it had something to do with poetry...
     
  4. alahay

    alahay Senior Member

    US
    Phoenicia
    HOME = bayt, mawten, manzel, misr, dar, ma'wa, maskan.

    Nothing! :(
     
  5. Plastech New Member

    English - United States
    Thanks, BAYT was just the clue I needed. Turns out, bayt also refers to a single line of poetry. Who knew...

    Thank you so much for your help!
     
  6. alahay

    alahay Senior Member

    US
    Phoenicia
    Hold on!

    we say bayt she3r for a verse from a poem which titerally translates to "house of poetry" meaning "verse fram a poem". We also use it for "improvisational songs" (i can't find the word, in italian it is "stornelli") e.g. bayt 3ateba or bayt mijana or bayt abou zzelof.

    Yet that doesn't work for a verse from the Bible.
     
  7. elroy

    elroy Motley mod

    Urbana-Champaign, IL
    Am. English, Pal. Arabic (See profile)
    The original question did not specify what kind of "verse," did it? ;) I'm actually surprised Alahay didn't get it!

    "Bayt" refers to a line of poetry. Arabic poetry is usually divided into lines, which are divided into two parts. The entire line (both parts) is referred to as a "bayt" (which, yes, is the word for "home" and "house").

    To Alahay's credit, "verse" was kind of a stretch. "Verse" in English (in the context of poetry) refers to the entire art of poetry as a whole. A line of poetry would be just that - a line. Otherwise, you have stanzas but not verses.
     
  8. alahay

    alahay Senior Member

    US
    Phoenicia
    I was very far from "line of poetry" with my verse analogy!
     
  9. Plastech New Member

    English - United States
    And to think that I am a native English speaker. :) My English was the most confusing part! Thanks again for your help guys.
     

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