1. The WordReference Forums have moved to new forum software. (Details)

حضرتك

Discussion in 'العربية (Arabic)' started by paieye, Dec 31, 2012.

  1. paieye Senior Member

    England
    English - British
    What does the word 'hadritak' mean literally ? It looks as though it means 'your (something),' but, if so, what is the 'something' ?
     
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2013
  2. Linolenic Senior Member

    Arabic
    Hadritak means "you" but in a respectful manner
     
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2013
  3. clevermizo Moderator

    St. Louis, MO
    English (USA), Spanish
    حضرتك literally means 'your presence' and is used as a term of respect. Note that the pronunciation 7aDritak is colloquial - the standard form would be 7aDratuka, 7aDrataka or 7aDratika (depending on grammatical case) but in practice 7aDritak is fine as you would hear it most commonly in actual speech. I think this is why the colloquial pronunciation is often found in introductory texts in Arabic. حضرة can be used as a respectful prefix حضرة الدكتور فلان، إلخ. (If you have more questions about this sort of term of address, please open a new thread to discuss them as it would be off-topic here.)
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2012
  4. paieye Senior Member

    England
    English - British
    Many thanks.
     
  5. economistegypt2010

    economistegypt2010 Senior Member

    Egypt, مصر
    Arabic, العربية
    Hi Paieye :) I just wanted to add something regarding the word حضرتك

    Where does حضرتك come from?

    You'll find this word extremely used in Egypt. Why? Because Egypt was conquered by the Ottoman Empire and was under the Muhammad Ali dynasty for awhile so some new words entered into our Egyptian accent especially when it came to titles such as , افندم, افندينا, حضرتك, باشا, بك This is regarding the origin of the word.

    When you can use such a word? You can use it when it comes to dealing with someone who is elder than you, sometimes it can be used with someone who is in a position higher than you or someone who you don't know

    In the end, it's a form of glorification
     
  6. paieye Senior Member

    England
    English - British
    Perfect, thank you.
     
  7. tr463 Senior Member

    تكساس
    English
    What is the plural of حضرتك ? Could someone please write it with tashkeel? Thanks :)
     
  8. OSamra New Member

    Arabic
    حضرتكم Or
    ايها الحضرات
     
  9. tr463 Senior Member

    تكساس
    English
    Thanks OSamra!

    Is it حَضرَتكم or حَضرِتكم ?
     
  10. OSamra New Member

    Arabic
  11. إسكندراني

    إسكندراني Senior Member

    أرض الأنجل
    عربي (مصر)ـ | en (gb)
    I would use حضراتكم
     
  12. jmt356 Senior Member

    Is حضرتك to be used with the name of the person (e.g., حضرتك محمد, as in “Mr. Muhammad”) or in place of the name (i.e., حضرتك by itself)?
     
  13. إسكندراني

    إسكندراني Senior Member

    أرض الأنجل
    عربي (مصر)ـ | en (gb)
    No, you would use السيد محمد but never حضرة alone, although it can be combined with other titles like حضرة المحترم
     
  14. jmt356 Senior Member

    So both حضرتك محمد and حضرتك alone are wrong?

    I have heard Egyptians call me حضرتك alone, without any other words such as محترم appended to it. For example:
    ممكن اعرف من حضرتك عنوان مكتبك؟
     
  15. cherine

    cherine Moderator

    Alexandria, Egypt
    Arabic (Egypt).
    Please read the posts carefully. Iskandarany said that حضرة alone is wrong.

    حضرتك is prefectly correct, and is how we address people respectfully (like the French "vous" or the Spanish "usted")

    Yes, this is how it is used.
     
  16. إسكندراني

    إسكندراني Senior Member

    أرض الأنجل
    عربي (مصر)ـ | en (gb)
    Bear in mind that the speaker doesn't intend to invoke the literal meaning of حضرة in any circumstance. It's a set expression like 'her majesty' or 'the right honourable'.
     
  17. jmt356 Senior Member

    Thank you for that correction. I did not notice the difference between حضرة, which cannot be used alone, and حضرتك, which can be used alone.

    The Spanish “usted” is conjugated in the third person singular. The French “vous” has its own special conjugation. Is the Arabic حضرتك conjugated in the same way as انت? For example:
    هل حضرتك ستأتي؟
    Or is it conjugated in the third person singular:
    هل حضرتك سيأتي؟
     
  18. cherine

    cherine Moderator

    Alexandria, Egypt
    Arabic (Egypt).
    No, it's like the French حضرتك ستأتي . I wasn't comparing the grammar, but the usage or the respectful tone of حضرتك , vous and usted.
     
  19. Hemza Senior Member

    Paris, France
    French, Moroccan Arabic
    Sorry for off-topic, but in Morocco, we use "مولاي" when we want to involve respectful tone. And "حاضر" is used to say "I'm present".
     
  20. إسكندراني

    إسكندراني Senior Member

    أرض الأنجل
    عربي (مصر)ـ | en (gb)
    Well, in morocco you use لالا (lalla) for women which is rather unique!
    but it should be clear that the usage discussed in this thread is strictly Egyptian.
     
  21. Hemza Senior Member

    Paris, France
    French, Moroccan Arabic
    Yes, this word comes from Berber ("madame" and "sayida" are also used) and it's also used in Algeria. Sorry for the off topic :(
     

Share This Page