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لَكِنْ vs. لَكِنّ

Discussion in 'العربية (Arabic)' started by jmt356, Feb 8, 2013.

  1. jmt356 Senior Member

    My theory is as follows:

    لَكِنَّ
    لَكِنَّ precedes nominal clauses (i.e., is followed by a noun or a pronoun).
    Examples:
    لكنّه ما زال غير جائع (but he was still hungry)
    وَلكِنِّي أَقُولُ لَكُمْ (but I say to you)

    لَكِنْ
    I cannot identify any patterns for لَاكِنْ. I have found لَكِنْ to precede both nominal and verbal clauses.
    Example of لَكِنْ followed by a noun:
    وَلكِنْ يُوحَنَّا مَنَعَهُ (but John forbade him)
    Example of لَكِنْ followed by a verb:
    وَلكِنْ لِتَكُنْ لاَ إِرَادَتِي بَلْ إِرَادَتُكَ (but not my will but yours)

    لَكِنِ
    I cannot identify any patterns for لَاكِنِ. I have found لَكِنِ to precede both nominal and verbal clauses.
    Examples of لَكِنِ followed by a noun:
    وَلكِنِ الَّذِي يَصْبِرُ إِلَى الْمُنْتَهَى فَهذَا يَخْلُصُ (but he who endures will be saved)
    Examples of لَكِنْ followed by a verb:
    لكِنِ ائْذَنْ لِي أَوَّلاً أَنْ أُوَدِّعَ الَّذِينَ فِي بَيْتِي (but let me say goodbye to those who are at my home)
     
  2. barkoosh Senior Member

    Beirut
    Arabic
    لكنْ and لكنِ are the same. You use لكنِ when the word after it starts with a silent letter, as in ولكنِ الذي and لكنِ ائذن. That's because you can't have two consecutive silent letters in Arabic.

    And you're right about the usage of لكنْ and لكنَّ.‎ لكنْ can precede a noun and a verb; لكنّ must precede a noun or a pronoun, and they should be then in the accusative. (لكنَّ has the same grammatical function of إنَّ)
     

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