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気持ちの悪いのがあるんだ。

Discussion in '日本語 (Japanese)' started by Maxi Muneyoshi, Apr 15, 2014.

  1. Maxi Muneyoshi

    Maxi Muneyoshi Junior Member

    por (BR)
    I found this sentence "高1の時に習ったことで、どうにも分からないと言うか、気持ちの悪いのがあるんだ。" and I have found the last part specially confusing. Why this "気持ちの悪い" instead of "気持ち悪い" ?

    source:

    http://www.tv-naruto.ne.jp/ejyuku/english/voca/adjective.htm
     
  2. Tonky Senior Member

    Japanese
    "気持ち悪い" is a colloquial adjective from "気持ちが悪い".
    気持ち悪い often changes into 気持ち悪い when it is used to modify a word.

    気持ち悪い→気持ち悪い / 気持ち悪いが外にいます / 気持ち悪いがある (second の=もの)
    Other examples:
    速い→足速い
    長い→髪長い女性


    Besides the reason above, 気持ちの悪いのある has が as the subject marker of the sentence, and we tend to avoid using another が when possible. (but not always.)
     
  3. nagoyano Senior Member

    Japanese
    In practice, 気持ちの悪い, 気持ちが悪い and 気持ち悪い are all the same.
    As Tonky said, --の and --が are interchangeable when combined with another noun.
    気持ち悪い is probably a shortened version of 気持ちが悪い/気持ちの悪い.
    This type of abbreviation (omitting --が, --の, etc) is quite common in modern usage.
     
  4. Maxi Muneyoshi

    Maxi Muneyoshi Junior Member

    por (BR)
    Thank you both for your answers.
     

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