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a 90 day warranty that then reduces on a pro-rated basis...

Discussion in 'English Only' started by tedyoon, Feb 6, 2008.

  1. tedyoon Junior Member

    Korea
    I read an advertisement about an electric cart. Could you let me understand the following sentence in easy English?

    "The vehicles come with a 90 day warranty that then reduces on a pro-rated basis until the warranty expires at 1 year."
     
  2. Matching Mole

    Matching Mole Senior Member

    England, English
    It means that you get a full warranty for 90 days. After that period the seller will cover only part of the cost of repairs, replacement, etc. For example, after 90 days the seller might pay for only 60% of the cost of repairs, then after 120 days only 30%, until the warranty completely expires at one year from the date of purchase, after which the buyer must pay the full cost of repairing the item.
     
  3. Madrid829 Senior Member

    Ohio
    US English, Great Lakes area
    Matching Mole is right. If it helps for future reference, prorated means that payment/distribution will be proportional. For example, some places that require you to purchase a membership sell 1-year memberships. Some might offer to prorate the cost, so that if you purchased the membership in July instead of January, you would only have to pay for 5 months instead of 12.
     
  4. Matching Mole

    Matching Mole Senior Member

    England, English
    That's right. "Pro-rated" (calculated proportionally) is a verb formed on the Latin phrase pro rata meaning "according to the rate" (proportional, proportionally).
     
  5. Madrid829 Senior Member

    Ohio
    US English, Great Lakes area
    Additionally, my dictionary references all have prorated as without a hyphen, which seems funny to me as I'm sure I've seen both ways (in this thread, for example). I don't know if one is more accepted than the other.
     
  6. Loob

    Loob Senior Member

    English UK
    The OED has it as "prorate", one word, with the comment "orig. and chiefly U.S." Most of the examples it gives are also written as one word, though the oldest examples are hyphenated.

    I had to look the word up: I'd never seen it before today:D
     
  7. Elwintee Senior Member

    London England
    England English
    I don't think 'prorated' is used in BE warranties, I would expect to see 'pro rata'.
     
  8. Matching Mole

    Matching Mole Senior Member

    England, English
    Although the meaning of pro[-]rated is clear from this context, I have not seen it used in the UK. I have occasion to use pro rata in the course of my work, but I would not use this verbification; I would say calculated pro rata, or otherwise use pro rata adverbially.

    It's very often used in respect to wages and salaries.

    I've never heard of the concept of "pro rata warranties" in the UK, either.
     

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