a British/Swiss/Italian joint venture company

Discussion in 'French-English Vocabulary / Vocabulaire Français-Anglais' started by Bugsy, Jun 25, 2013.

  1. Bugsy Junior Member

    Hi!

    I am never too sure how to use Joint venture in French

    "X is a British/Swiss/Italian joint venture company located in japan"

    Are both suggestions OK in your opinion? also could anyone confirm if I should add an "s" to britanniques/suisses/italiens?

    "X est une joint-venture à fonds britannique/suisse/italien située au Japon"

    or

    "X est une société en joint-venture à fonds britannique/suisse/italien située au japon"

    Many thanks for your comments!
     
  2. OLN

    OLN Senior Member

    Alsace, France
    French - France, ♀
    Tu sais qu'il faut accorder les adjectifs au nom. :)
    Qualifient-ils fonds au pluriel ou société ou joint-venture ?

    PS : Les barres entre les adjectifs ne me semblent pas très françaises ; pourquoi ne pas séparer les adjectifs par des virgules et et ou fabriquer un néologisme ?
     
  3. Bugsy Junior Member

    silly me of course

    X est une joint-venture à fonds britanniques, suisses, italiens située au Japon

    merci OLN
     
  4. OLN

    OLN Senior Member

    Alsace, France
    French - France, ♀
    Avec des virgules seulement, la phrase est comme en suspens. Il faudrait terminer la liste par et.
    à fonds X, Y et Z

    Je pensais aussi à une joint-venture tri-nationale, X, Y et Z
    ou : multinationale, X, Y et Z
     
  5. bh7 Senior Member

    Limestone City
    Canada; English
    [Can] une coentreprise britannique, suisse et italienne ...
    [Can] join venturerers => coentrepreneurs

     
  6. Bugsy Junior Member

    Thanks to both of you. yes it does need the "et". As the text is for an international audience I think I will use joint-venture. However I do like coentreprise as I always find it hard to use an English word in a French sentence! Is coentreprise used in France? sorry I haven't lived there for nearly 30 years! or is joint-venture more commonly used?
     

Share This Page