a lady barber

Discussion in 'English Only' started by arueng, Aug 11, 2010.

  1. arueng Senior Member

    CHINESE
    Hi,

    I had my hair cut today, and the barber is a lady.

    What do you call a lady barber? A barberess or a barbress? Thanks.
     
  2. kayokid

    kayokid Senior Member

    Chicago
    English, USA
    Hello. I think one of the terms used nowadays is stylist. This can refer to both a man or a woman. There may be an implication here that the haircut you are getting is a bit fancier than some other types of haircuts but that is not necessarily the case, as far as I know. I am sure there other suggestions to follow...
     
  3. arueng Senior Member

    CHINESE
    Thanks, Kayokid, for the word stylist.

    But my lady barber is really plain! What would you call her?
     
  4. Nunty

    Nunty Modified

    Jerusalem
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    Then she is simply a barber. :)
     
  5. relic5.2 Senior Member

    English - Ireland
    arueng, were you at a barber's or a hairdresser's? A stylist would only be found in a hairdresser's. A lady barber to me is just a barber.
     
  6. arueng Senior Member

    CHINESE
    Thanks, Nunty.
    Doesn't a lady barber sound better? When I see the word "barber," I think of a male barber!

    Thanks, relic.
    I was at a barber's!
     
  7. Brioche

    Brioche Senior Member

    Adelaide
    Australia English
    Barber is rare or old-fashioned in Australia.

    There is very little shaving and beard trimming done these days.

    Hairdresser is the usual word here, and covers male and female hairdressers.
     
  8. kayokid

    kayokid Senior Member

    Chicago
    English, USA
    I think the term you are looking for is simply barber, as the other members have suggested. If there is a need to clarify that it is a woman you can simply say: She... or My barber is a woman.

    I think the term stylist is used a bit more freely around here nowadays but I always knew it as relic5.2 explained. Thanks, relic5.2!
     
  9. Packard

    Packard Senior Member

    USA, English
    Where I live it is either a "stylist" or a "hair cutter".

    There are different licenses for barbers. Barbers are licensed to shave using a razor and require additional training.

    Hair cutters do not use a razor (for shaving), but get involved with other processes like coloring, permanents, etc.
     
  10. sdgraham

    sdgraham Senior Member

    Oregon, USA
    USA English
    I call my barber "Darlene," which is convenient because that's her given name.

    She operates the "xxx Barber Shop."

    This agrees with Nunty, but as with other trades involving appearance, affectatious terms, such as "stylist," also abound.
     
  11. Nunty

    Nunty Modified

    Jerusalem
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    There are many professions that were once predominantly male that do not have special terms for a female practitioner: doctor, architect, engineer, driver, chemist, detective, and... barber - among others.
     
  12. Just call her a barber.

    If you start calling her a hairstylist she'll put her prices up.

    Rover
     
  13. Hermione Golightly Senior Member

    SW London
    British English
    I have never heard of a woman who cuts men's hair being called anything other than a hairdresser by the customers. I think hairdressers call themselves hair stylists as their professional title.

    Hermione
     
  14. Packard

    Packard Senior Member

    USA, English
    In New York, if a man wants a buzz cut (crew cut or flat top) he would go to a barber shop and pay $11.00 for the job.

    Or to a Hair Salon and pay $35.00 for the same job.

    Barber shops are unpretentious places where men (or women) get simple haircuts by male or female barbers (who have barber licenses).

    Hair salons have hair cutters with hair cutters' licences and the people giving the hair cuts are called stylists or hair cutters (but never "barbers"). Hair cutters can be either male or female (but apparently from my experience must smoke cigarettes).
     
  15. sdgraham

    sdgraham Senior Member

    Oregon, USA
    USA English
    Around here, I wouldn't be caught dead saying I was going to the hairdresser instead of Darlene, my barber.:eek:
     
  16. Packard

    Packard Senior Member

    USA, English
  17. Hermione Golightly Senior Member

    SW London
    British English
    [QUOTE[Around here, I wouldn't be caught dead saying I was going to the hairdresser instead of Darlene, my barber.:eek: [/quote]

    Just goes to show doesn't it!
    My husband 'goes to the barber's' but the woman who does his hair is not called a barber, or barbress or barberette, barberine, or, come to that, Barbera.)
    My hairdresser is called Gina. She is called Gina by the men whose hair she does.

    Hermione
     
  18. SaritaSarang

    SaritaSarang Senior Member

    Oklahoma
    English - United States
    A barber is for a man, a woman would be called a stylist.
     
  19. cabecitaloca New Member

    Spain
    English - England
    In England, we just call them hairdressers. Generally, somebody who styles a woman's hair is a hairdresser, someone who cuts a man's hair is a barber. But stylist is being used more and more, but it's generally used in more exclusive places.
     
  20. natkretep

    natkretep Moderato con anima

    Singapore
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    My choice of term depends on the kind of establishment rather than on gender. I go to the barber's shop, always indicated with a barber's pole on the outside - the person might sometimes shave the back of my neck or beside my ears and nowhere else. This person is a barber, whether male or female. If I needed to emphasise the gender I would just say male or female barber; or man or lady barber.

    I have occasionally gone into places that are called hair salons or hairdressers. The person would be a stylist or hairdresser regardless of gender.
     

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