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a papar aire ... teniendo en el pobre Lázaro su victima

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by speedier, Feb 24, 2008.

  1. speedier

    speedier Senior Member

    Context. From the book. La vida de Lazarillo de Tormes y de sus fortunas y adversidades (which I'm reading for pleasure).
    Así estuvimos durante ocho o diez días, yéndose mi patrón por las mañanas, muy contento y arrogante, a papar aire por las calles, teniendo en el pobre Lázaro su victima.
    The bold words are the problem areas for me. My try:
    That's the way we spent the next eight or ten days: my master going out in the mornings, very pleased and arrogant, taking the air around the streets, having in poor Lazaro his victim.
    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Rayines Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    Castellano/Argentina
    Hello:
    Here you have the Spanish definition of "papar":

    papar.
    (Del b. lat. pappāre, comer).

    1. tr. Comer cosas blandas, como sopas, papas, etc. sin mascar.
    2. tr. coloq. Tomar comida.
    3. tr. coloq. U. en exclamaciones para llamar la atención de otro sobre algo en que no reparaba como debía, o para indicarle que recibe su merecido. ¡Pápate esa!

    Real Academia Española © Todos los derechos reservados
    :)
     
  3. speedier

    speedier Senior Member

    Thanks Rayines. I had already seen it before posting, but it didn't help. Perhaps I need a rest. :confused:
     
  4. Rayines Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    Castellano/Argentina
    Sorry, I should have supposed it. But what happens with "papar" is that it isn't a common expression. We sometimes use it as "papar (eat) moscas"= estar distraído.
    My intention wasn't to send you to the dictionary :), but actually to try to give you a better idea about the meaning.
    I think "take" isn't a bad idea, but I don't know....:rolleyes:
     
  5. alexacohen

    alexacohen Senior Member

    Santiago de Compostela
    Spanish. Spain
    Hello Speedier,

    Lázaro means that his squire went out every morning to eat thin air.
     
  6. speedier

    speedier Senior Member

    Of course! Why didn't I think of that. Thanks alexa.

    And thanks again Rayines. I was starting to be tempted by the flies idea.
     

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