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A pesar de que + subjunctive/indicative?

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Grammar / Gramática Español-Inglés' started by graciosa, Nov 7, 2009.

  1. graciosa

    graciosa Junior Member

    English - USA
    Hola!

    In the clause that follows "a pesar de que", does one use the subjunctive or the indicative?:confused:

    Gracias!
     
  2. chamyto

    chamyto Senior Member

    Burgos, Spain
    Spanish
    Could you please give us an example ?
     
  3. la_machy

    la_machy Senior Member

    Hermosillo, Sonora, México.
    Español de Sonora
    Yes, please.
    A whole sentence would be great, since either of them could be admissible.


    Saludos
     
  4. graciosa

    graciosa Junior Member

    English - USA
    I will try, but I think I was unclear in my question. Let me give you some sentences in English, and perhaps you can kindly tell me the correct translation in Spanish?

    "Although I don't appear to be, I am 30 years old."
    "Although you may not believe it, he is very smart."

    I presume that one uses the subjunctive in these cases. Is it correct to use it with "a pesar de que", or must one use "aunque" in these cases?
     
  5. Masuas Senior Member

    Aunque no lo aparento, tengo 30 años.
    Although he's very old, he's still very active
    Aunque sea viejo, todavía está muy activo.
     
  6. slazenger14

    slazenger14 Senior Member

    Where there is doubt or a hypothetical situation, subjunctive.
    Where you're stating a fact and you are sure, indicative.
    This goes for "a pesar de que" and "aunque".

    Aunque no lo creas, él es inteligente. (You are not sure if he may or may not believe it).
    Aunque no lo crees, él es inteligente. (If you are sure that he believes it but just restating what he believes, use the indicative).

    Más ejemplos:
    Voy a ir a pesar de que ella no venga a la fiesta. (I don't know if she's coming to party or not, but I'm going anyway).
    No me dan ganas de salir a pesar de que ella sale esta noche. (I know for sure that she's going out, but still don't feeling like going out).

    Te dejo este link en caso de que sigas dudando.
    http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=392253
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2009
  7. alebeau

    alebeau Senior Member

    New Orleans, La.
    United States - English
    Hello, this is a good question. I agree fully with Slazenger14.

    Think of it this way:

    Aunque = A pesar de que

    Basically, when 'Aunque/A pesar de que' is followed by the subjunctive, it means 'Whether or not / Even if . . .' (Expressing a certain doubt because you really don't know.)

    However, when 'Aunque/A pesar de que' is followed by indicative, it means 'Even though / Although . . . ' (Expressing a certainty about something.)

    Look at the examples Slazenger14 gave us:

    Aunque / A pesar de que no lo creas, él es inteligente. (Whether or not you believe it, he is intelligent.)
    -- > This sentence is saying 'I don't know whether or not you believe he's smart, but either way, he is (even if you don't see it).' (This is the reason for the subjunctive; it is expressing a certain sense of doubt.)

    Aunque / A pesar de que no lo crees, él es inteligente. (Even though you don't believe, he is intelligent.)
    -- > This sentence is saying 'I know for a fact that you don't believe he's smart, and although you don't think he is smart, he is!' (this is the reason for the indicative; it is expressing a certainty.)

    Hope this helps,

    --André L.
     
  8. graciosa

    graciosa Junior Member

    English - USA
    Yes, very helpful! Thanks a lot!
    Muchas gracias!
     

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