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  1. Niners12 Senior Member

    San Jose, California
    English (American)
    Es una especificación técnica...

    "Cuando un cajón es completamente removido, las partes activas expuestas deberán de estar protegidas total y permanentemente contra contactos a prueba de dedos."

    Mi intento: "When a drawer is completely removed, the active exposed parts must be completely and permanently protected against contacts ???"

    ¿Qué quiere decir con eso de a prueba de dedos?

    Gracias
     
  2. Oldy Nuts

    Oldy Nuts Senior Member

    Santiago, Chile
    Spanish - Chile
    Bueno, yo tampoco entiendo lo que sería un "contacto a prueba de dedos". Tal vez se quiso decir "contactos con los dedos (de personas)". Es decir, que no haya ninguna posibilidad que los dedos de alguna persona entren en contacto con las partes activas.
     
  3. gengo

    gengo Senior Member

    Man, that must be one fancy drawer, to have "active" parts! What does that even refer to?

    As you probably know, "a prueba de" means "xxx-proof," so the idea here is that the drawer is made finger-proof. Not sure exactly why that is necessary or what it entails, but the idea is pretty much as Oldy Nuts has described.

    Go 'Niners!
     
  4. Niners12 Senior Member

    San Jose, California
    English (American)
    The 'active' refers to voltage. It's concerning low-voltage control panels.
    Anyway, didn't really know that "a prueba de" means "xxx-proof," so thanks for the help. I understand it a bit better now.
    Wish I was back home in SF like you ;)
    Un saludo
     
  5. gengo

    gengo Senior Member

    Ah, so maybe it means the parts need to be covered to prevent someone from accidentally touching them and getting shocked. Either that, or they want to protect the circuitry against fingerprints (oil).

    Well, the Niners looked horrible on Sunday, so you aren't missing much yet!

    Go Giants!
     
  6. Oldy Nuts

    Oldy Nuts Senior Member

    Santiago, Chile
    Spanish - Chile
    En ese contexto, la expresión más o menos usual aunque no muy correcta es "con corriente", no "activo/a"; y entiendo que en inglés se usa "live". Y, por supuesto, las partes activas/con corriente que queden expuestas deberán estar completamente protegidas contra contactos con seres/animales vivos, no sólo contra contactos con los dedos de las personas. Salvo que lo que se desee no sea asegurar la protección de seres vivos contra accidentes eléctricos, sino que evitar que dichas partes puedan recibir grasa de los dedos. Una cuestión de prioridades, me imagino...
     
  7. Niners12 Senior Member

    San Jose, California
    English (American)
    Yeah, I think you're right.
    And yes, my English grammar skills went out the window some time ago, jeje. I also seem to eschew traditional rules like that one.
    Unfortunately, I caught the Niners game on my buddy's SlingBox... not pretty. And to think we could have drafted Aaron Rodgers!!!

    ps - I'm an A's fan!!! (though still pulling for the Giants right now)
     
  8. Fallen_Crow New Member

    Spanis - Argetinan spanish
    when a drawer is completly removed, the actives parts that remains exposed must be full and permanently covered for a finger proof.

    how about something like that, im not sure if actives can be used in that way.
     
  9. Oldy Nuts

    Oldy Nuts Senior Member

    Santiago, Chile
    Spanish - Chile
    Sin ser nativo, "for a finger proof" no me suena nada de correcto. Y si se pudiera usar, sería "active" y no "actives".
     
  10. Fallen_Crow New Member

    Spanis - Argetinan spanish
    tienes razon, pero para no desentonar tanto de la base de la oracion trate de darle ese sentido.

    sobre active y actives tienes razon.

    quiza seria mejor que a ese oracion se le escribiese, "a riesgo de electro ejecucion"
     
  11. Archilochus Senior Member

    New Mexico
    American English
    This is a very (very) old thread, and I wouldn't be adding anything to it except for the fact that I was thinking about 'a prueba de' this morning. For English speakers who are wrestling with this expression, I want to point out that there is a high-falutin' form of this in English: X is proof against Y. For instance, we can say something like, "The new fence is proof against rabbits." ("The new fence is rabbit-proof.") or, "That vest is proof against bullets." (That vest is bullet-proof). It's a pretty formal mode of saying X is Y-proof, but one does encounter it.
     

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