A quién le enviaste el paquete

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Grammar / Gramática Español-Inglés' started by Zimone, Oct 9, 2008.

  1. Zimone Senior Member

    Chile - español
    Hi everyone.

    To ask "¿A quién...?" in English, for example:¿A quién le enviaste el paquete?", do I need to add "to" at the end of the question "Who did you send the package to?"? Or you say "Who did you send the package?"?
    Does it depend on the use of the used verb that sometimes it must be used and sometimes not?

    Thanks a lot
    :)
     
  2. Porteño Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    British English
    Yes indeed, you certainly need to add the word 'to'. Similarly 'Who did you speak to?
     
  3. Zimone Senior Member

    Chile - español
    Thanks a lot!

    But adding "to" or not at the end of the question depends on the verb, right?
    For example, with "visit", I'd say:
    "Who did you visit last week?" WITHOUT to, because the verb "visit" doesn't use it (opposite to "talk"). That is, I wouldn't say "I visited to my friend", but "I visited my friend". So that the question doesn't need it either, right?


    :)
     
  4. aztlaniano

    aztlaniano Senior Member

    Lavapiestán, Madrid
    English (Aztlán, US sector)
    Para ser muy, muy correcto, por no decir pendante, sería "to whom did you send ...", en vez de "who did you send the package to?" (con "to", en cualquier caso)

    "Whom did you visit last week? (sin "to") I visited my friend. I talked/spoke to my friend. I saw my friend. I kissed my friend".
     
  5. Zimone Senior Member

    Chile - español
    Thanks,
    but could you say: "Who did you vistit last weekend TO"? :confused:
     
  6. Porteño Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    British English
    NO! Prepositions are required only if needed with the base verb, e.g.

    listen to
    speak to
    look at
    etc.etc.
     
  7. aztlaniano

    aztlaniano Senior Member

    Lavapiestán, Madrid
    English (Aztlán, US sector)
    Porteño is right.
     
  8. lqs2n Junior Member

    U. S. English
    ¡Hola! About your question, I believe that the correct English phrase would be: To whom did you send the package? You can't put the to on the end of the sentence; that would be called a "dangling preposition" and English doesn't allow that.

    Keep up the good work!

    lqs2n
     
  9. Zimone Senior Member

    Chile - español

    RIGHT! That was exactly what I thought. I just needed to be sure.
    Thanks a lot!
    :)
     
  10. Zimone Senior Member

    Chile - español


    Hi, and thanks for your answer.
    I knew "to whom". But according to aztlaniano that sounds (or is) pedantic, or maybe not so used in the "normal" (that is, not necessarily used in the streets, but not at college either) language. Is it so?
     
  11. lqs2n Junior Member

    U. S. English
    It is true that "on the street" you may hear "Who did you send the package to?". You will be understood, but it is grammatically incorrect. You must use "To whom did you send the package?"
     
  12. mhp Senior Member

    American English
  13. FromPA

    FromPA Senior Member

    Philadelphia area
    USA English
    I'm usually a real stickler when it come to grammar, but "whom" is practically a dead word in English (except when it immediatly follows a preposition), and ending a sentence with a preposition is so common and accepted (far more common than the "proper" construction) that it's seems pretty funny that you felt it necessary to assure Zimone that it would be understood. In formal writing I always write it the way you suggest - It's hard to break old habits - but I have given up telling people they're wrong for writing it the other way.
     
  14. aztlaniano

    aztlaniano Senior Member

    Lavapiestán, Madrid
    English (Aztlán, US sector)
    Estamos mezclando la cuestión de "dangling prepositions" con la de "who/whom". Se puede decir, y se dice, "whom did you send the package to?", o "to who did you send the package". (Ambos me suenan mal).
    "Whom", en teoría aunque cada vez menos en la práctica, se debe emplear en vez de "who" cuando se trata de un objeto, sea directo o indirecto.
    Otra cosa es la preposición al final de la frase o al menos apartada del objeto.
    El vínculo que nos aporta mhp señala que la preposición "descolgada" lleva al menos siglos.
    Al respecto, se cuenta que Churchill, mosqueado porque su editorial le había retocado una frase para colocar la preposición "en su sitio" respondió en una carta: "This is the sort of bloody nonsense up with which I will not put", burlándose así de la obsesión del editor al respecto. (Lo normal hubiera sido "...nonsense I will not put up with".)
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2008
  15. lqs2n Junior Member

    U. S. English
    Tiene razón cuando dice que la frase de Churchill, up with which I will not put, suena mal. En la vida diaria, uno diría, which I will not put up with. No es correcto, pero suena mejor.
     

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