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a think

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Moon Palace, Dec 11, 2008.

  1. Moon Palace

    Moon Palace Senior Member

    Lyon
    French
    Hello everyone :),
    I am in the course of reading a book on the abolition of slavery, and the author writes this sentence, talking about David Hume's work:

    "One may wonder if it is quite fair to judge the whole work and think of the philosopher in the light of this single footnote."

    I am puzzled by this use of think to refer to what I would have called the thought of a philosopher. Am I wide of the mark? I know one can have a think, but I wouldn't have associated this kind of think to a philosopher's work.

    Thanks in advance for your valuable answers as always. :)
     
  2. xebonyx

    xebonyx Senior Member

    TR/AR/EN
    That's possible. But it's also possible to assume that it's saying "One may wonder if it is quite fair to (judge and)...think of the philosopher.."

    Unless you can provide more sentences (before and after).
     
  3. bibliolept

    bibliolept Senior Member

    Northern California
    AE, Español
    Think of this sentence this way: "One may wonder if it is quite right to think of the philosopher and judge the whole work in the light of this single footnote." Here, "one" is doing both the judging and the thinking.
     
  4. Moon Palace

    Moon Palace Senior Member

    Lyon
    French
    Of course, I guess my long day is taking its toll on my reading... I hadn't thought about to judge and to think of... How very silly of me! Sorry for bothering you for such a simple question, and many thanks for your help. :)
     
  5. xebonyx

    xebonyx Senior Member

    TR/AR/EN
    No bother at all :)
     
  6. bibliolept

    bibliolept Senior Member

    Northern California
    AE, Español
    We're only too happy to help.
     

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