Adjective of "enemy"

Discussion in 'English Only' started by JBN, Jan 23, 2007.

  1. JBN New Member

    Telugu and India
    Hi,

    would like to know adjective of the word 'enemy'.

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. anglicana Senior Member

    France
    hostile

    or

    enemy (fire)
     
  3. winklepicker

    winklepicker Senior Member

    Kent
    English (UK)
  4. okey-dokey Senior Member

    Italy
    English / UK, London
    Anglican,

    Enemy is not an adjective. You can say the soldiers are hostile but not the soldiers are enemy. When enemy is used in the noun phrase enemy fire enemy is classifying fire but that does not make it an adjective.
     
  5. . 1 Senior Member

    Ferntree Gully
    Australian Australia
    enmity n , pl -ties. a feeling of hostility or illwill, as between enemies;
    antagonism.
    antagonism n 1 openly expressed and usually mutual opposition.

    Are these any good to you?

    .,,
     
  6. JamesM

    JamesM à la Mod

    Welcome to the forum, JBN. Can you give some context? Can you post a sentence that would use the adjective?
     
  7. lazarus1907 Senior Member

    Lincoln, England
    Spanish, Spain
    Antagonistic, hostile, conflicting,...
     
  8. Dimcl Senior Member

    British Columbia, Canada
    Canadian English
    What would a "conflicting" enemy be?
     
  9. Bridgita Senior Member

    Inglés-USA
  10. la reine victoria Senior Member

    Hi JBN,

    May I suggest "adversarial"? "Adversary" is a synonym of "enemy".

    LRV
    _____________________________
    :D We are frequently amused.:D
     
  11. cuchuflete

    cuchuflete Senior Member

    Maine, EEUU
    EEUU-inglés
    I disagree. Enemy, in the phrase enemy fire, is an adjective. What other part of speech would you
    call a word that modifies or classifies a noun in such a construction?

    Try contrasting it with friendly fire. Do you doubt that friendly is an adjective also?
     
  12. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Skipping past enemy (adjective) definition 1 (obsolete) to :
    OED
     
  13. lazarus1907 Senior Member

    Lincoln, England
    Spanish, Spain
    Adverbs usually modifies verbs ("etymologically") and adjectives, but in English it is common to see one noun modifying another too (e.g. fire alarm), unless I'm wrong, of course. How do you differentiate in these cases an adjective from a noun, apart from checking a dictionary? Most adjectives can be turned into adverbs by adding -ly (e.g. honestly, supposedly), but I can't see how you can do this with "enemy". I am not saying that it is not an adjective; I am just asking, honestly.
     
  14. cuchuflete

    cuchuflete Senior Member

    Maine, EEUU
    EEUU-inglés
    Please give one or more examples. I suspect that the modifying nouns you refer to also have
    an adjectival use.

    Hunting rifle.


    –adjective 3.of, for, engaged in, or used while hunting: a hunting cap.
    Is this the sort of thing you mean?
     
  15. lazarus1907 Senior Member

    Lincoln, England
    Spanish, Spain
    Surely many nouns are also adjectives, and gerunds like "hunting" are easily used as adjectives too. I'll collect some examples and I'll open a new thread instead, if that is ok with you.
     
  16. cuchuflete

    cuchuflete Senior Member

    Maine, EEUU
    EEUU-inglés
    Sounds good to me.
     
  17. Giordano Bruno

    Giordano Bruno Senior Member

    English, England
    The combination of two nouns does not make the first noun and adjective. You can combine just about any two nouns, e.g. "jam jar". The first noun acts like an adjective, but it is still just part of a noun pair.
     
  18. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    That would be a jam-jar :)

    This is one of many examples of nouns being used attributively - in effect as adjectives.

    Sometimes I think this is simply a matter of what you call a word when it is used in a particular sense, or whether or not you stick a hyphen between jam and jar.
     

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