adjectives like (blue-skinned)

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by MrMojoRising, Dec 8, 2008.

  1. MrMojoRising

    MrMojoRising Senior Member

    Español de Argentina
    I am reading a book, and it says: "The scarlet light of the three moons glistened on their blue skin as they skipped over the sandy ground, and their excited grins revealed beautiful, yellow teeth."

    And my friend JesuisSob helped me with the translation (I'm going to copy-paste) :D

    "La luz escarlata de las tres lunas brillaba sobre su piel azul mientras ellos (as) brincaban sobre el suelo arenoso y sus exitadas sonrisas revelaban una hermosa dentadura amarilla."

    And it is talking about some little weird creatures, and I wanted to say something like: Blooms are a group of little blue-skinned and yellow-teethed creatures.

    I just want to know what rule should I follow with this kind of composed adjectives (blue-skinned and yellow-teethed for example).


    Thanks for your time.
     
  2. JeSuisSnob

    JeSuisSnob Moderator

    Mexico City
    Mexican Spanish
    Ja ja. Me parece que me comí una "c" (excitadas).

    Lo que no sé es cómo debas traducir "Blooms" -quizás lo debas dejar así.

    "... son un grupo de pequeñas criaturas de piel azulada y dientes amarillos."

    Espera más sugerencias. Saludos.
     
  3. MrMojoRising

    MrMojoRising Senior Member

    Español de Argentina

    Siii !! eso fue lo que quise poner, Blooms es el nombre de estas criaturas, entonces en mi resumen del cuento quiero anotar en mi cuaderno que: son un grupo de pequeñas criaturas de piel azulada y dientes amarillos (esa era mi idea, yo lo traduje al inglés eso no estaba en el libro) pero no estaba segura de que los adjetivos estuvieran bien, cómo se hace con los "compound adjectives", te sabés la regla?
     
  4. JeSuisSnob

    JeSuisSnob Moderator

    Mexico City
    Mexican Spanish
    Ja ja, no, pero a lo mejor en unos minutos entra Aztlaniano y nos da una idea. Saludos. :)
     
  5. MrMojoRising

    MrMojoRising Senior Member

    Español de Argentina

    Ok, yo me voy a dormir mientras (son las 4 am). Gracias por todo.
     
  6. greenheyes Senior Member

    Spain
    British English (Cheshire)
    I´m no expert on compound adjectives, but I´d say they´re based on the structure
    adjective+noun. The noun is then changed into a sort of false verb because you add the suffix -ed.
    eg. 1.with blue eyes= blue-eyed
    2 with long legs= long-legged
    3. with square shoulders= square-shouldered

    They´re always written with a hyphen. Hope that helped. Regards.
     
  7. MrMojoRising

    MrMojoRising Senior Member

    Español de Argentina

    Thanks greenheyes!! So, you say I can form any adjective (to describe a person) adding a noun to an adjective? wow that's easy :D

    Sorry if it was silly, but we don't have those adjectives in Spanish.

    Blonde-haired, large-footed, small-handed, large-structured, short-haired, small-handed..... but short-handed has another meaning.
    Oh, I'm starting to think these compound adjectives are as hard as phrasal verbs are.


    Thank you, guys !
     
  8. la zarzamora

    la zarzamora Senior Member

    buenos aires
    argentina-spanish
    What are you reading????

    Anyway, I think it is "blue-skinned and yellow-teethed little creatures"(I changed the word order). But I have no idea about the adjectives.

    Why not keep it simple and just write: "...are a group of little creatures with blue skin and yellow teeth".
     
  9. Forero Senior Member

    Houston, Texas, USA
    USA English
    It's yellow-toothed, not yellow-teethed, and I would leave off the and just to be clear that each creature is both.
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2008
  10. MrMojoRising

    MrMojoRising Senior Member

    Español de Argentina
    Hi Zarzamora.
    I am reading a book titled "Boozo and the storyteller" and I wanted to make a summary (I'm not good at writing) saying: Blooms are....... well that whole thing. So I wanted to use those compound adjectives.

    Don't take me wrong... haha the author writes good, the problem it's me.

    Thanks for your correction.
     
  11. Forero Senior Member

    Houston, Texas, USA
    USA English
    "Blooms are little blue-skinned, yellow-toothed creatures."
     
  12. la zarzamora

    la zarzamora Senior Member

    buenos aires
    argentina-spanish

    It is "don't get me wrong" and I do no think it is "....writes good", maybe "he is a good author" or ".....writes well" or wait for natives' suggestions.
    By the way, I think you are reading children's book. Try something else.

    One more thing, you wrote "moons" and then "blooms". Which one is it?
     
  13. Forero Senior Member

    Houston, Texas, USA
    USA English
    Don't get me wrong: the author writes well; the problem is me.

    "Don't get me wrong" is normally used to criticize something frankly without malice to its author, but it can mean simply "Don't misunderstand me."

    "Don't take this the wrong way" is used to criticize something frankly with no malice toward the person being spoken to.

    "Don't take me wrong" doesn't mean anything to me.
     
  14. MrMojoRising

    MrMojoRising Senior Member

    Español de Argentina
    Hi Forero, and thanks I think I got the compound adjectives now.

    Adjectives go with singular nouns.

    And thanks for the corrections, I think I wanted to write "don't get me wrong" but as we say "no me tomes a mal" and "tomar=to take", so I got into a mess with the verbs. :eek:

    That was the only book I could get, I'm not studying at university, just alone at home. :rolleyes:

    Ah, the word in the quote is "moons", but the creatures are called "Blooms".
     
  15. SDLX Master

    SDLX Master Senior Member

    Lima, Peru
    Spanish - Peru
    I concur. :thumbsup:
     

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