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adjectives to describe good food

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Brave Heart, Jun 9, 2007.

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  1. Brave Heart Senior Member

    Japan, Japanese
    Hi all,

    I understand there are a wide variety of adjectives to describe food that has a pleasing flavor, including good, delicious, tasty, yummy, pleasant-tasting, scrumptious, delectable, etc....

    But I believe some adjectives are used frequently, while others used less frequently.
    What are the most commonly used adjectives to describe this thought in an informal conversation (say, with a friend)?

    If possible, please give me typical sentences in which such adjectives are used.

    Thanks. :)
     
  2. nichec

    nichec Senior Member

    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    --How's the pizza?
    --Good!/ Great!/ Delicious!

    --How's the pie?
    --Oh, it tastes like heaven!/Hmmm....it's too good to be true.

    --How's the ice cream?
    --(it's) Better than everything I have ever tasted.
     
  3. clairanne Senior Member

    East Sussex
    english UK
    Hi

    We use "yummy" quite often.
     
  4. cachatouille

    cachatouille Junior Member

    England english
    I agree, 'yummy' gets used a lot, although it's very informal, mostly used in an affectionate child-like way, so probably not a word you would use as an english male out with friends or in a business meeting at a restaurant.

    'Lovely' is used quite a bit:
    This steak is lovely/ That was a lovely meal thanks

    As well as 'delicious' or simply 'good' as in:
    This is good food
     
  5. Brave Heart Senior Member

    Japan, Japanese
    Thanks nichec, clairanne and cachatouille. I appreciate your help. :)
     
  6. orlando09 Senior Member

    France, PACA
    English (England)
    Gorgeous or fantastic - if it's really very, very good
     
  7. clairanne Senior Member

    East Sussex
    english UK
    hi

    More informal ones -used by "girlies" are "scrumptious" or "delish" or mouth watering is a good one.
     
  8. Brave Heart Senior Member

    Japan, Japanese
    Thanks orlando09 and clairanne. I appreciate your help. :)

    Is my understanding correct that "mouth-watering" is not girlish and that it basically means "looks/smells good"? Or can it also mean "tastes good"?
     
  9. nichec

    nichec Senior Member

    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    Actually I often hear the hosts of "cuisine programs" saying:
    --Oh, this is beautiful!:eek:
    (But well, that's probably just for show......)


    Edit: And no, you don't have to thank me again:D
     
  10. orlando09 Senior Member

    France, PACA
    English (England)
    There's nothing girlish about it. It could describe the smell of some food (probably the best use when you think of the actual meaning) or food with a delicious taste, but it's not something IMO that most people say. I think it's more likely to be an expression you'd read in a food review or something. e.g. I can't really imagine myself, or my friends, saying "mmm this fish is mouth-watering" etc but I can easily imagine a review/resturant guide saying "the restaurant offers a selection of mouth-watering desserts", for example.

    Fabulous is another option.
     
  11. candy-man

    candy-man Senior Member

    London/Madrid
    Polish/Poland
    I wannted to propose mouth-watering but it'd been mentioned before.

    1.This beefburgeer is just toothsome.
    2. Every time I buy tomatoes over there, they are so succulent(its inside is fresh)

    Maybe that helps.
     
  12. cachatouille

    cachatouille Junior Member

    England english
    'Succulent' is fine, but toothsome would probably never be used in everyday conversation, it would more likely be used by a food critic looking for more superlatives.
     
  13. orlando09 Senior Member

    France, PACA
    English (England)
    IMO "toothsome" has a rather quaint ring to it. You would expect a character in a Dickens novel or something to use it - "your roast beef is most toothsome, my dear", for example..
     
  14. cachatouille

    cachatouille Junior Member

    England english
    Absolutely.
     
  15. squidink

    squidink Senior Member

    Venezuela, Spanish
    Finger-licking good?
     
  16. nichec

    nichec Senior Member

    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    Then you need to have something on your fingers to lick, no?:confused: (oil, liquid...)
     
  17. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    This is an endless list-making thread.
    This one is about to go the way of all list-making threads, closed.
     
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