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admit driving vs admit having driven

Discussion in 'English Only' started by youngbuts, Apr 5, 2013.

  1. youngbuts Senior Member

    korean
    Hi~ everyone!

    I have a question about what is difference between #1 and #2, and #3 and #4.

    1.She admitted having driven the car without insurance.
    2. She admitted driving the car without insurance.

    3.She admits having driven the car without insurance.
    4. She admits driving the car without insurance.


    I assume that in #1 her driving the car without insurance had been once or at most twice, that is, not so many times. But in #2, her driving without insurance seems to have happened many times. Even until the time she admitted it, her driving habit seems to have been still on. Similarily, in #3 her driving without it happened once or twice in the past, but she doesn't any more, while in #4, it is still going on as her driving habit. I was wondering if my understanding was near to the real meaning. Would you kindly teach me?


    Many thanks in advance
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2013
  2. boozer Senior Member

    Bulgaria
    Bulgarian
    I would throw in a 'to' somewhere in there. :)

    1.She admitted to having driven the car without insurance. - She drove an uninsured car for some time in the past. May have been once or twice, may have lasted for years. No way of knowing. If the admission took place just recently, it could mean the same as 3.
    2. She admitted to driving the car without insurance. - Without context there is no way of knowing if she is still driving the car without insurance or this happened in the past and is no longer the case.
    3.She admits to having driven the car without insurance. - This is more or less the same as 1. The present tense 'admits' could reveal her general attitude of not wanting to hide something.
    4. She admits to driving the car without insurance. - Out of context I would think she was driving without insurance right now or generally in the present, possibly temporarily. Context might change that impression of mine.
     
  3. youngbuts Senior Member

    korean
    Thank you very much for your detailed and clear explanation, Boozer. Although everything is difficult, the English Tense is one of the most difficult things for me, as English tense is much different from mine. Thanks to you, I feel I'm getting close to it. :)
     

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