Adverbs such as "Sunday"

Discussion in 'English Only' started by takaef, Mar 29, 2010.

  1. takaef New Member

    Tokyo
    Japanese
    Hello!

    When I learned "Sunday", "Monday".... and "Saturday" as nouns, teacher said I had to add proposition "on" in front of them.

    Recently I found that they can be adverbs too.
    Like...
    'They said Sunday "Volvo was bought by a Chinese company".'

    Are there any other nouns which can be adverbs like this?
     
  2. Tiggie7384 Senior Member

    Lugano, Svizzera
    English - Australia
    Was this written in a newspaper or said out loud?

    The phrase "They said Sunday" seems incorrect to me. I would have thought either:
    They said on Sunday...;
    On Sunday they said...
     
  3. entangledbank

    entangledbank Senior Member

    London
    English - South-East England
    This is characteristic of AmE; it's much less common in BrE and AusE, though still possible: 'I went there Sunday' sounds okay to me, but the AmE news-headline use of these nouns sounds quite wrong.

    They're nouns, not adverbs. Certain noun phrases can be used on their own (that is, without a preposition) as adjuncts of time: for example 'last week', 'next year', 'every summer', and so on. I don't know if AmE speakers can use plain seasons like 'summer' as an adjunct: ?'Summer we go to our beach house.'

    We can also use some plural nouns as adjuncts: 'weekends', 'evenings', 'Sundays', and phrases such as 'Sunday evenings'.
     
  4. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    AE uses days of the week adverbially. I can't immediately think of other examples.
     
  5. takaef New Member

    Tokyo
    Japanese
    Thank you all.
    My understand is that days of the week are used as adverb in American English, but not in other English.

    It really helps me.

    I am reading English new paper which is published in Japan, and I often see them. That means they are using American English, maybe?
     
  6. tm2111327 Senior Member

    Chicago, USA
    English - United States
    This is common in American newspapers and press releases, especially with the word "announced".

    "It was announced Sunday (that)..."
    "... ,it was announced Sunday."
    "They said Sunday (that)...
    "... ,they said Sunday."

    Despite being an AmE speaker, it sounds wrong to me.
     
  7. tm2111327 Senior Member

    Chicago, USA
    English - United States
    Not that I've heard.
     
  8. Forero Senior Member

    Houston, Texas, USA
    USA English
    "They said Sunday 'Volvo was bought by a Chinese company'" sounds confusing. I would put a that between Sunday and Volvo:

    They said Sunday that "Volvo was bought by a Chinese company".

    ... or at least a comma:

    They said Sunday, "Volvo was bought by a Chinese company".

    This does not work with names of seasons or months:

    Sunday we go to our beach house. :tick: [Sunday probably = this coming Sunday]
    Summer we go to our beach house. :cross:

    I'll see you Sunday.
    :tick:
    I'll see you July. :cross:

     
  9. Tiggie7384 Senior Member

    Lugano, Svizzera
    English - Australia
    As far as a newspaper is concerned, it is worth noting that the style of writing is also determined by space/word count. It is common for newspapers, regardless of if they are written in AmE, BrE or even AusE, to exclude words that are not 100% necessary.
    In your example: They said Sunday 'Volvo was bought by a Chinese company' it looks to be a space saving attempt as in my opinion it is clear that it should actually read: They said on Sunday 'Volvo was bought by a Chinese company'.

    As far as determining if it is AmE or BrE, look for words ending "ize" or "ise". AmE uses the "z", whereas BrE uses the "s", as does AusE.
     
  10. takaef New Member

    Tokyo
    Japanese
    Tiggie7384 san

    Thank you.
    Maybe I must put "on" when I speak English.
    This is just for new paper or things which have space limit. OK understand.
     

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