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  1. cathi0002 Junior Member

    INDIA- HINDI

    Hola a todos:

    Por favor explica el significado de la siguiente frase:


    Pueblecitos de Castilla en donde muy pocos practicarán hoy el uso del baño en agua caliente, poseían baños públicos en el siglo XIII.

    gracias
     
  2. Little towns in Castilla, were many few will use today hot water showers, had public baths in the XIII century
     
  3. Agró

    Agró Senior Member

    High Navarre
    Spanish-Navarre
    Little towns in Castille where very few people will use today hot water showers, had public baths in the 13th century.
     
  4. cathi0002 Junior Member

    INDIA- HINDI
    Like this says not many people take hot water showers in little towns of Castilla?????
     
  5. Bevj

    Bevj Allegra Moderata

    Girona, Spain
    English (U.K.)
    ¿Hay una razón concreta por traducir 'baño ' como 'shower'?
    Mi intento - 'Little towns in Castille where very few people will today have a hot bath, had public baths in the 13th century.
     
  6. ptak30

    ptak30 Senior Member

    Where exactly in the sentence does it mention the word for showers in Spanish? Surely they are just saying that although few people in the little towns of Castille take hot baths now, there were public baths (presumably hot) in the 13th Century.
     
  7. scotu Senior Member

    Paradise: LaX.Nay.Mex.
    Chicago English
    In the 13th century the villages in Castillio had public baths, but these days not many (villagers) are able to take a hot bath.
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2011
  8. Bevj

    Bevj Allegra Moderata

    Girona, Spain
    English (U.K.)
    I'm not sure if the implication is that they can't have a hot bath, or simply don't, for whatever reason.....
     
  9. Csalrais

    Csalrais Senior Member

    Tenerife
    Spanish - Spain
    En todo caso, el libro (o ensayo) de Américo Castro del que procede la frase es de 1948, por lo que veo en wikipedia, así que se debería tener cuidado al extender ese "hoy" a la actualidad, 60 años después.
     
  10. ptak30

    ptak30 Senior Member

    The phrase is what is known in English as a "back-handed compliment". The villages are being commended for having public hot baths in the 13th Century, but at the same time the current citizens are being gently chided for not bathing in hot water often enough. Csalrais's observation is pertinent. In 1948, as I understand it, the country was being dragged out of starvation by the Peron government's monetary loans and shipments of maize, wheat, lentils and meat. Possibly, things were not as bad rurally but I should imagine that taking regular hot baths was not a priority for most citizens.
     

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