ahora me gastas medias

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by megxoan, Oct 9, 2008.

  1. megxoan Junior Member

    U.S., English
    Hello, I am trying to read "Las medias rojas", by Emilia Pardo Bazán, and I am having a hard time understanding the meaning of "gastas medias", and "novidá" (the footnotes say: forma regional de novedad) here is the context:

    -qué novidá es ésa?
    -Cuál novidá?
    -Ahora me gastas medias, como la hermana del cura?
    Se levantó la muchacha, y la llama que empezaba a subir, dorada, lamedora de la negra panza del pote, alumbró su cara redonsa, bonita, de facciones pequeÑas, de boca apetecible, de pupilas claras, golosas de vivir.
    -Gasto medias. gasto medias-repitió, sin amilanarse-.

    -What region is she from?
    -What region?
    -Now you bring me stockings, as the priest's sister?
    The girl stood up, and the flame that started to climb, golden flames licking from the black of the pot, illuminated her round face, beautiful small features, appetizing mouth, clear pupils, sweetness of life.
    -I bring stockings, I bring stockings, he repeated without heart.

    Please help!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 23, 2014
  2. Sprachliebhaber Senior Member

    USA English
    Lo de novedad es correcto. Medias son stockings. "Now you're wearing stockings, like the priest's sister?" Y creo que es "she repeated".
     
  3. kotosquito Senior Member

    Champaign, Illinois, USA
    United States, English
    I think this is much closer, though not perfect:

    --What news is that?
    --What news?
    --Now you use up my stockings, like the priest's sister?
    --The girl got up, and the flame that started to rise, golden, licking up the black belly of the pot, illuminated her round, pretty face, her delicate features, appetizing mouth, her clear pupils gluttonous for life.
    --I use up stockings, I use up stockings--she repeated, without being intimidated
     
  4. Cenzontle

    Cenzontle Senior Member

    English, U.S.
    "Gastar" can be a synonym of "llevar" (or "llevar puesto", or "usar"), meaning "to wear" (an item of clothing).
    It need not imply "consume" or "use up"
    (just as in English you can "wear" a piece of clothing with no thought of "wearing it out" or reducing its quality through "wear and tear").
    I don't know the story, but I can speculate that wearing red stockings might be seen as a sign of shamelessness,
    and what she said "without being intimidated" (by an implied accusation of shamelessness)
    might have been like "So I wear stockings, so what?"
     
  5. micafe

    micafe Senior Member

    United States
    Spanish - Colombia
    "Novidá" = "novedad" (not 'region')

    I think "Me gastas medias" doesn't mean "you're wearing my stockings" but "you're wearing stockings (I have to pay for)"
     
  6. kotosquito Senior Member

    Champaign, Illinois, USA
    United States, English
    --? pero eso de "ME gastas medias"? Si gastar significara llevar (como de ropa) aquI, ? luego cOmo se traducirIa? "You wear stockings for me"? O tal vez "Now you wear red socks on me" (en el sentido de hacerle una mala pasada a alguien)?
     
  7. micafe

    micafe Senior Member

    United States
    Spanish - Colombia
    En español usamos mucho pronombres que son imposibles de traducir al inglés. :eek:
     
  8. kotosquito Senior Member

    Champaign, Illinois, USA
    United States, English
    Pero habrA manera de explicarlos....y traducirlos. Se dice "me" (en el texto en cuestiOn) porque el hablante siente que la que lleva las medias rojas se lo estA haciendo a El--Como en "Me robO el coche me hermano adicto"--En inglEs, "My addict brother stole my car on me"
     
  9. Cenzontle

    Cenzontle Senior Member

    English, U.S.
    "Now you're [offending me by] wearing red stockings."
     
  10. micafe

    micafe Senior Member

    United States
    Spanish - Colombia
    Sí, algo así. Cenzontle, tú al contrario de kotoskito, entiendes que esos pronombres son intraducibles, ¿verdad?. Yo no sé cómo explicar en inglés el uso de esos pronombres. Es cuestión de aprenderlos a usar ya sea por la costumbre de oírlos o por estudiarlos concienzudamente.
    :eek::(
     
  11. kotosquito Senior Member

    Champaign, Illinois, USA
    United States, English
    No obstante la existencia de pronombres intraducibles, "Now you're wearing red stockings on me" es buena traducciOn en este caso, a mI me parece.
     
  12. JennyTW Senior Member

    Córdoba, Spain
    English - UK
    I agree with Micafé that these pronouns are very difficult to translate. But in this case I don't think it means that this person has to pay for the stockings because it says "como la hermana del cura" and surely he/she wouldn't pay for the priest's sister's stockings too.

    I think "me" is used more in the sense that this action affects that person. I think it's similar to the idea encapsulated in; "and now you go and wear stockings, like the priest's sister".
     
  13. Elcanario Senior Member

    En un lugar de Castilla
    Spanish - Spain
    JennyTW tiene razón. Con eso de " ahora me gastas medias... " lo que hace es reprocharla, echarla en cara que ahora use medias y al usar ese ahora puede indicar que no es el primer reproche que le dice, por eso le responde tajante que sí, que en efecto las usa, como diciéndole que eso es asunto suyo y se pone lo que le viene en gana.
    saludos
     
  14. Txiri

    Txiri Senior Member

    USA English
    Agree on all counts. There is a name for this use of the indirect object pronoun, I'd have to go look for it, and I'm not sure I still have the book.

    Your translation of it is very well done, in my opinion, brilliant, as you Brits say.

    kotosquito: it's an "on me" kind of construction, although "on me" isn't the best way to handle this particular text

    And finally, with elcanario, yes, it's a "me" of reproach. "You went and did it" inspite of me. You knew I didn't want you to do that. Or, "You up and did it," with the same kind of context.
     
  15. SydLexia Senior Member

    London
    UK, English
    What about using "take to"?

    "and now you've taken to (wearing) stockings" ??
    "and now you go and take to wearing stockings" (strong reproach)
    "and now you take to wearing stockings"

    syd
     
  16. JennyTW Senior Member

    Córdoba, Spain
    English - UK
    No, I don't think it works so well. I think we need the "go and" (or something similar) but your second sentence is much too cumbersome.
     
  17. Elcanario Senior Member

    En un lugar de Castilla
    Spanish - Spain
    Txiri, se que esto es offtopic, pero no me resisto :D, no se sí lo sabes pero tu nickname en ciertas zonas del norte de España significa porro, canuto, joint. Siento haberme salido del tema :D.
    Saludos
     
  18. Txiri

    Txiri Senior Member

    USA English
    Esto no lo sabía, pero sí es parte de una palabra compuesta en euskera que tiene cierto significado para mí. Menos mal que no sea nada peor. :D
     

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