ain't [meaning and use]

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Krams, May 1, 2005.

  1. Krams Junior Member

    Barcelona, Catalonia
    Catalonia, Catalan
    Howdy!
    I'd really like to know what does "ain't" mean, and how it is used in english. If someone can helps me: answer.
    Thanks and regards,
    Krams
     
  2. jacinta Senior Member

    California
    USA English
    Hi, Krams,

    I know this has been discussed many times, especially in the English forum. I tried to search for you but couldn't come up with anything. Very strange. I'm sure the English speakers would love to help you so I'll move it there.
     
  3. ameridude Junior Member

    USA/English
    ain't = isn't. The usage is vulgar and grammatically improper.
     
  4. te gato

    te gato Senior Member

    Calgary, Alberta
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    Hey Krams;
    ain't..is like saying are not...am not..

    It ain't right to use ain't in written English..in written English you should always use..'I am not'...
    but for spoken English it is used..'I ain't going to go tonight'..(oh that hurt me to do that!!)
    Here is a good link on the usage and history of ain't...

    http://www.bartleby.com/64/C001/007.html

    te gato;)
     
  5. gaer

    gaer Senior Member

    Fort Lauderdale
    US-English
    Jacinta, I think this underscores why proper titles are so important!

    The same thing happened to me last night in a discussion about "get to". We talked about it at length, but I could not find any link to our discussion…

    It's a shame to lose so much, because I remember the comments were quite thorough about "ain't". :(

    Gaer
     
  6. mylam Senior Member

    Texas
    United States English
    This is "vulgar" in the sense of informal and/or uneducated. Not vulgar in the sense of offensive. :)

    Myla
     
  7. gaer

    gaer Senior Member

    Fort Lauderdale
    US-English
    Also it is used a lot humorously, and that's why it's such a shame that we lost the other thread, because we talked about this in depth. :)

    Gaer
     
  8. Krams Junior Member

    Barcelona, Catalonia
    Catalonia, Catalan
    Ok, I think I got it.

    te gato: Thanks for the web!! :)

    Thanks to all, I ain't so confused now!
     
  9. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
  10. LV4-26

    LV4-26 Senior Member

    Thanks very much for the link, whodunit.

    Now I did know that "ain't" was mainly used for am not, is not, are not, have not
    but I'd never have thought it was also used fot do not, does not (as mentionned on that web page).
    Unfortunately nobody seems to have quoted any sample sentence of this kind.
    Could someone provide a sentence where "ain't" is used for do not/does not/did not ?

    I guess it must be even less correct (like "He ain't speak English" for example ?)
    Thanks.
     
  11. timpeac

    timpeac Senior Member

    England
    English (England)
    Hi - I can't think of an example where it would replace "do not". No one would say "he ain't speak English" just "he ain't speaking English" (and so replacing "isn't").
     
  12. mylam Senior Member

    Texas
    United States English
    "Ain't got" = doesn't have, as in "He ain't got nothing to do." Of course, this sentence also includes a double negative. Gramatically, it should be: He doesn't have anything to do.

    This combination is the only one that comes to mind right now.
     
  13. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    You're right, Mylam. I really love the song called "Baby it's you" where one line reads as follows:

    You ain't got to buy nothing ...

    It's a really slangy song; there're used following words:

    tryna, 'em, 'cause, 'lot, gettin', spinnin', lookin', wanna, nothin', b'coz, nothin', gotta, missin', da, ta, I'ma, yeah etc.

    I can understand them, but it's hard without the lyrics in front of you.
     
  14. te gato

    te gato Senior Member

    Calgary, Alberta
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    Hey LV4-26;
    First..you are welcome...
    Second..yes the use of 'ain't' for 'do not..does not..is very slangy...
    'He ain't (does not) got any money'..
    'Well I ain't (do not) got any to give him'..
    'I ain't gonna' ask for any'...

    Oh!!! that was SO painful...:eek: no more!!!

    te gato;)
     
  15. gaer

    gaer Senior Member

    Fort Lauderdale
    US-English
    "He ain't got no money."
    "He don't got no money."

    I've heard both of these. I may not like the sound of them, but I do understand them. So anyone who can't think of a place where "ain't" and "do not" are used in the same sentence hasn't been around really poor people in the US (and perhaps in other countries too), though you have to contract "do not" to "don't" to make it work. :)

    Now, I don't (ain't) got nutin' more ta say 'bout it. ;)

    Gaer

    Gaer
     

Share This Page