Ajoute un nouveau fleuron à son tableau de chasse

Discussion in 'French-English Vocabulary / Vocabulaire Français-Anglais' started by rmtf, Jun 29, 2009.

  1. rmtf New Member

    England, English
    How can I translate this expression into English?
     
  2. Michel09

    Michel09 Senior Member

    New York, NY
    français - France
    What is your attempt at the translation?
     
  3. GerardM

    GerardM Senior Member

    Paris, France
    French
    Hi rmtf, Michel09,

    rmtf: I cannot give you the translation into English but I can give you some explanations/clues.

    Of course, as a bilingual English-French, Michel09 has got the precedence over me.

    In the old times, at hunting, people used to set killed animals on the ground to show off ;) and why not arrange them in a beautiful way in order to take a picture (with the hunter in front of it).
    It was a bit like a painting ("tableau" in French).
    You've here the meaning of "tableau de chasse" = total number of kills.

    In a figurative sense, we use the expression "tableau de chasse" about a seductor (list of conquests) or a pilot during the war (total number of hits) and as a matter of fact to speak about some good results.
    ~~
    A "fleuron" is a masterpiece, a kind of jewel = one of the most beautiful pieces on the board.
    (in heraldry (coat of arms), a "fleuron" is a decoration looking like a stylized flower) <- not the subject here
    (a "fleuron" may also be a typographic ornament usually in the shape of a flower or a leaf) <- not the subject here



    "Ajoute un nouveau fleuron a son tableau de chasse" means add another major piece to his/her/one's hunting board.

    Curious to know the exact expression in English...

    HTH

    PS: It's my first response on the forum - I hope I respected the rules...

    Hi everyone,

    >we use the expression "tableau de chasse" about a seductor (list of conquests)
    I'm sorry: I made up this word... I meant seducer. :eek:
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 30, 2009
  4. la traductrice

    la traductrice Senior Member

    "India - Tamil"
    Can you give us the whole french sentence pls?
     
  5. la traductrice

    la traductrice Senior Member

    "India - Tamil"
    Hmm...Are we,by any chance,talking about "Adding a feather in one's cap"???
     
  6. rmtf New Member

    England, English
    The sentence reads: Apres 5 prix a l'echelle nationale, il ajoute un nouveau fleuron a son tableau de chasse - un premier prix categorie "porteurs de tradition".
     
  7. GerardM

    GerardM Senior Member

    Paris, France
    French
    rmtf,

    What do you think about the phrase suggested by la traductrice?

    I took a look at "Add a feather in one's cap" on several Web sites and I think it would be fine.
    Do you know, do you use this expression?
     
  8. rmtf New Member

    England, English
    Yes, I think "add a feather in/to one's cap" should do the trick nicely. Thanks to everyone who helped me on this one.

    I was thinking of "adding a jewel to his crown" as the context is winning a prize, but I think the 'feather' idiom conveys the idea of enhancing reputation better.
     
  9. akaAJ Senior Member

    New York
    American English, Yiddish
    I can't help it. I think "feather" treats the matter too lightly. How about "trophy" ?
     
  10. fairybell Senior Member

    England
    You could also use 'add another string to your bow'
     
  11. GerardM

    GerardM Senior Member

    Paris, France
    French
    Another expression suggested by my friend is "add another notch on/in/to one's belt".

    Asking a search engine about this, I get oodles of links meaning it's a common expression.
    What do you think?
    ~~ edit
    Isn't "a string to the bow" rather refering to another skill more than a new trophy...
    I remind you that in French, it means a trophy after an achievement, a success...
    In rmtf's case, it is another award after several ones at a national "level".

    According to the French sentence in post #6, this last succes is better than the previous ones so that it's the jewel in the known...

    But again "Ajoute un nouveau fleuron à son tableau de chasse" is just another success similar to the others.
     
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2009
  12. Lotuselisa Senior Member

    How about: "To add a new string to one's bow".
     
  13. fairybell Senior Member

    England
    Rethinking that, ip_001 has a point: feather in the cap or notch in the belt are the only ones that translate that sense of another achievement in a line of achievements and I guess the notch in the belt sounds more serious than the feather...
     
  14. akaAJ Senior Member

    New York
    American English, Yiddish
    I'm surprised that both an Anglophone and a Francophone propose "Add a new string to one's bow", which, as far as I know, means "to add a new talent/skill/job to one's repertoire", figuratively "a new weapon in his armory": a lawyer adds expertise in a new field, a pitcher perfects a new pitch ... I've also heard "add a notch to one's [pistol] grip/handle" and "add a scalp to one's belt", but adding a notch to one's belt means one has been eating too much.
     
  15. Scrivener Senior Member

    France
    English - UK
    It's a dog's dinner of a phrase in the first place: a "fleuron" being an ornamental part of a crown and a "tableau de chasse" being a tally of kills or conquests.

    To render the mixed metaphor, how about "notched up another trophy" ?
     
  16. akaAJ Senior Member

    New York
    American English, Yiddish
    US sports writers often say "notched [sometimes with "up"] another victory". The also say "bagged another trophy". They have been known to botch the language.
     
  17. OLN

    OLN Senior Member

    Alsace, France
    French - France, ♀
    C'est écrit par un journaliste ?
    ajouter un fleuron à son tableau de chasse est très maladroit, et je suis généreuse . On dirait un virenquisme ou un johnnysme ;)

    - on ajoute des trophées à un tableau de chasse
    - on ajoute un fleuron à sa couronne : on acquiert un bien exceptionnel ou un titre de gloire. La courone fait allusion à la couronne d'un roi.
     
  18. GerardM

    GerardM Senior Member

    Paris, France
    French
    Hi akaAJ, hi everyone,
    Aren't you confusing with adding a hole to the belt? ;)

    If you ask a search engine (e.g. Google) about "add a notch on the belt", you'll find many links...
    -> http://www.pokernetwork.com/forums/main-noticeboard/18554-females-add-another-notch-their-belt.html
    -> http://www.channelregister.co.uk/2008/09/15/eu_ita_proposal/
    -> etc.
    ... in my humble opinion, the links don't lead to pages speaking about eating much.
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2009
  19. GerardM

    GerardM Senior Member

    Paris, France
    French
    Hi OLN, hi everyone,

    Contrary to what I wrote in post #11
    I agree that we rather say "ajoute un trophée à son tableau de chasse".
    A "fleuron" by itself (alone) gets the idea of the best trophy of all.

    So I would personally accept "ajoute un fleuron à son tableau de chasse" as a way to say that the guy added more than a new trophy, the best of them all: a true jewel!

    NB: "Jewel" is the English word for "fleuron" in my Hachette-Oxford dictionary.



    Additional explanations -
    Fr "Fleuron" has got other meanings in French and is translated by:
    - fleuron in printing (or tailpiece when at the end of a chapter)
    - fleuron in architecture (or sometimes by finial)
    - floret in botany
    - fleuron in cooking
     
  20. Already-Seen mod'if

    US
    French - France
    Speaking of notches, there is also 'add a notch to one's bedpost;' however it doesn't quite match the more literary style of the French expression.
     
  21. akaAJ Senior Member

    New York
    American English, Yiddish
    "Adding a hole" (actually piercing a new hole) means you have really been gorging" "letting out a notch" means moving the clasp one more hole": from Google" "If you can't get your fingers in there, the girth is too tight and needs to be let out a notch". "Take in a notch" refers to belt-tightening in hard times. Apparently "let out a notch" has also been taken up in some sporting circles to mean "open up the throttle one more peg" (avancer le levier d'un cran). That sportswriters (or poker columnists) mix carving a notch on a pistol grip to mark another kill with cutting a notch into a belt (see above; not a real practice) is just one of those things; I suppose if the phrase is repeated often enough, its factitious origin will be forgotten.
     
  22. GerardM

    GerardM Senior Member

    Paris, France
    French
    ;) How naughty!

    Even as a French guy, I understand the expression but I know it as "add a notch to one's bedhead".

    ~~ edit
    Thanks for detailed words akaAJ.
     

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