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Al fin y al cabo

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by Gaitero, Oct 1, 2006.

  1. Gaitero

    Gaitero Junior Member

    Lanark, Scotland
    English - Scotland
    Este frase (arriba) se use a veces en "Amor en el tiempo de coléra" por Marquez.

    ¿Qué es la diferencia entre los dos palabras: cabo y fin. Había creido que tenían eñ mismo sentido?

    Gaitero
     
  2. natasha2000

    natasha2000 Senior Member

    Al fin y al cabo es una frase hecha. When all is said and done... In the end...

    cabo y fin significan lo mismo, pero no siempre son intercambiables.
     
  3. MuayThai Junior Member

    London
    Spanish & Spain
    "Al fin y al cabo" es una frase hecha, que podria ser equivalente a "at the end of the day, after all..."
    Cabo normalmente es mas usado en el sentido geografico, fisico, del final o extremo de algo, ademas del accidente geografico "cape".
    Pero si hablamos de "tiempo" (dia, mes...), una pelicula... usamos fin.
    Cabo no es muy utilizado en es sentido de "find" salvo en esta expresion y en otra parecida: "al cabo de...."
    Al cabo de 5 minutos: after 5 minutes
    no se si ayuda en algo?
     
  4. westopia Senior Member

    spanish
    Pues hay que diferenciar el cólera de la cólera. ;)
     
  5. Gaitero

    Gaitero Junior Member

    Lanark, Scotland
    English - Scotland
    Gracias a MuayThai y Natasha

    Me habéis ayudido mucho

    Gaitero:thumbsup:
     
  6. padredeocho Senior Member

    United States
    al fin y al cabo

    In the final analysis?

    Thanks!
     
  7. riglos Senior Member

    Argentina - Spanish
    No, significa simplemente "after all,..."

    Mara.-
     
  8. chick Senior Member

    Virginia, USA
    English USA
    They both mean= the end, so depends how they are used.
     
  9. riglos Senior Member

    Argentina - Spanish
    No, Chick, "al fin y al cabo" es una sola frase que significa "after all,..."

    Mara.-
     
  10. xOoeL Senior Member

    Español - España
    I think that the equivalent is "at the end of the day"
     
  11. riglos Senior Member

    Argentina - Spanish
    xOoel, ¿Eres hispanoparlante? Nunca escuché esta frase utilizada con el significado "al final del día".

    Mara.-
     
  12. Tizona

    Tizona Senior Member

    Spanish - Spain
    Pues yo sí que soy hispanohablante y creo que sí, que "al fin y al cabo" es más o menos lo mismo que "at the end of the day".
     
  13. JB

    JB Senior Member

    Santa Monica, CA, EEUU
    English (AE)
    "at the end of the day" is an expression that has become disgustingly popular in the last year or two, that is the equivalent of "al fin y al cabo". No significa "al final del día" en el sentido de la medianoche o del anochecer.

    Ver aqui para leer otro hilo que ya se trató de "al fin y al cabo.". Literally, it is "at the end and at the end". In other words, as has been said already, "at the end of the day," "when all is said and done", "bottom line", etc.
     
  14. xOoeL Senior Member

    Español - España
  15. riglos Senior Member

    Argentina - Spanish
    Perdón xOoel, ahora entiendo. Creí que querías decir que no significaba lo mismo que "after all", pero after all, "at the end of the day" y "after all" son equivalentes.

    ¡Saludos!

    Mara.-
     
  16. dalton2

    dalton2 Senior Member

    Málaga, Málaga, Spain
    Spain, Spanish
    Y creo que también se puede traducir como "all in all".
     
  17. workman Senior Member

    English UK
    "Disgustingly popular?" It seems you don't like this phrase... That's OK, but it may be good to clarify for our Hispanic friends that this phrase has for many years been a perfectly acceptable way of saying "when all is said and done", or "after all" or even (as we say in the UK) "when the pot boils dry..."
    :)
     
  18. Fuerza New Member

    Earth, Terran
    I'm afraid that I'm going to have to agree with "jbruceismay" on this one. "At the end of the day" has become so colloquialized that it really does not mean what those who are learning English may think it means. I, myself, recall hearing people say this and remember asking them if they really meant 'the day has ended' or something else - and here I am, a native, asking for clarification of my own language. Most of the time they meant something else.

    My suggestion, to avoid confusion, is to stick with the more understood:

    When all is said and done
    In the end
    After all
    All in all

    ...for "Al fin y al cabo"


    It may be that it is a British/American thing, with different expressions receiving greater favor in one country or another, but I doubt that is the case with this expression.
     
  19. AngieGM Senior Member

    Spanish (Spain)
    Este frase (arriba) se use a veces en Amar en los tiempos del coléra DE Márquez.
     
  20. emiuly Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    Agrentinian spanish

    Oi!

    Can you give us an exemple of how to use this expression?

    I don't seem to be able to put it anywhere :confused:
     
  21. workman Senior Member

    English UK
    Which expression? (I mentioned various).
     
  22. emiuly Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    Agrentinian spanish
    When the pot boils dry...
     
  23. JB

    JB Senior Member

    Santa Monica, CA, EEUU
    English (AE)
    It is a synonym for "al fin y al cabo" (but in the U.K., I think). I don't recall hearing the expression myself, but the meaning should be pretty clear from context:
    "Well, when the pot boils dry, we have no option other than surgery."
    "Pues, al fin y al cabo, tenemos que operar."
    "Well, bottom line, we need to operate."
    "Well, when all is said in done, there is no other choice left to us but surgery."
    etc.
    All of the expressions listed mean the same thing.
     
  24. emiuly Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    Agrentinian spanish
    Thanks very much!
     
  25. josealejo New Member

    Spanish
    Quiero saber si es correcto usar la expreción "Al fin y al cabo" en esta oración:

    "...Lo correcto es hacer las cosas sin esperar nada a cambio, solo tenía que aceptarlo, al fin y al cabo yo sabía que ese tipo de cosas podían suceder..."
     
  26. Moritzchen Senior Member

    Los Angeles, CA
    Spanish, USA
    Pero si tu lengua natal es el español, por qué estás preguntando en un foro inglés-español?
     
  27. la_machy

    la_machy Senior Member

    Hermosillo, Sonora, México.
    Español de Sonora
    Hola, josealejo.
    ¡Bienvenido a WR! :).

    Es correcta.


    Saludos
     
  28. josealejo New Member

    Spanish
    Mmm disculpa, ni siquiera me fije. Soy nuevo aquí, solo vi el Post y creí que estaba en el lugar correcto.
     
  29. josealejo New Member

    Spanish
    Muchisimas Gracias.
     
  30. chacahua Senior Member

    Midwestern American English
    Saludos.

    I'd just like to chime in that "at the end of the day" is absolutely, positively a completely acceptable and common phrase, at least here in the States. You don't use it every other sentence, but it is certainly something you can get away with using every now and again. This actually makes it a better translation for "al fin y al cabo," o sea, tampoco se escucha todo el tiempo "al fin y al cabo," ¿verdad? Pero sí se escucha.

    "All in all" and "after all" are probably more precisely translated as "después de todo" or "por fin" or "finalmente," whereas "al final de cuentas" and "al fin y al cabo," while basically synonymous with "después de todo," etc., are probably translated more precisely as "at the end of the day" or "after all is said and done" or "when you get right down to it," etc (that sort of thing). This is a somewhat rare case in which English and Spanish really do have the same basic ways of saying the same basic thing.

    If one wants to argue that a certain expression is less than acceptable among a certain class of people or a certain region or what have you, then fine, argue that and detail which classes/regions say what. But don't confuse a class/regional issue with one of commonality or general acceptability; they are not the same thing. "At the end of the day" is said on a "regular" basis (one or more times per week, I would say) by millions of native English speakers. A todos los hispanohablantes nativos les aseguro: que lo digan si quieren, que aqui en EEUU lo decimos con bastante frecuencia.

    Hope this helps.
     
  31. workman Senior Member

    English UK
    I agree. "At the end of the day" of course does not literally mean at the end of 24 hr period of time, any more than "caught between a rock and a hard place/ caught between the devil and the deep blue sea/ entre la espada y la pared" mean those things literally. But these phrases should still be known and learnt because they are commonly used.

    One minor disagreement - unless I'm mistaken, "after all" or "all in all" should not be translated "por fin", which has a more specific meaning of "at last."
     
  32. Mexico RV'er Senior Member

    Mexico
    English - USA
    You would use it exactly the same way you use "Al fin y al cabo." It has nothing to do with the day's end (midnight, sunset) and everything to do with "When all is said and done." I think we have managed to make this much more complicated than it needs to be.
     
  33. crisophilax New Member

    Spanish
    No estoy muy seguro de las recomendaciones de este hilo. Al menos, en mi opinión, la expresión "al fin y al cabo" significa mas bien "Como no puede ser de otro modo...". P.ej: "Me gusta la paella. Al fin y al cabo soy español."

    En cambio las expresiones "At the end of the day" y "when the pot boils dry" se refieren una situación en la que se han extinguido las opciones y solo queda una solución posible.

    Espero no liarlo mas.. :)
     
  34. Go Blue Senior Member

    Michigan, USA
    English - USA
    You have no other choice - you were born Spanish.

    They have no other choice - it has to be this was....

    Janet
     
  35. Go Blue Senior Member

    Michigan, USA
    English - USA
    Welcome to the forums :)
     
  36. Go Blue Senior Member

    Michigan, USA
    English - USA
    They have no other choice - it has to be this way.
     
  37. crisophilax New Member

    Spanish
    Thanks, Go Blue.

    I checked this thread for the expression "al fin y al cabo", but I think the translation "at the end of the day" is not totally right. However, it is recommended in many places. The expression "at the end of the day we're all the same" is really equivalent to "al fin y al cabo todos somos iguales".
    Probably I'm wrong because of hearing politicians and football players using it ad nauseam on TV.

    BR
     

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