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Algerian Arabic: Food going off

Discussion in 'العربية (Arabic)' started by mini91, Aug 3, 2012.

  1. mini91

    mini91 Senior Member

    UK
    English-UK
    Would like to know what the Algerian word is to describe when food has gone off or become inedible
    Thank you!
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2012
  2. ayed Senior Member

    Riyadh
    Arabic
    elakil mkhammij/khammaj
     
  3. mini91

    mini91 Senior Member

    UK
    English-UK
    Thank you! I suppose that is the where the word 'khamja' comes from in order to describe something as unclean etc
     
  4. ayed Senior Member

    Riyadh
    Arabic
    Some Najdian Badawi in Saudi call the palm dates wetted with some drops of water , became ruined and taste awful " tamr mkhammij" or tamr khimeej.
    لسن العرب:
    وخمج اللحم يخمج خمجا : أروح وأنتن . وقال أبو حنيفة : خمج اللحم خمجا ، وهو الذي يغم وهو سخن فينتن . وقال مرة : خمج خمجا : أنتن . الأزهري : وخمج التمر إذا فسد جوفه وحمض
     
  5. Schem

    Schem Senior Member

    Unaizah
    Najdi Arabic
    I didn't know that word used in Algeria! Interesting.
     
  6. makandés66 Senior Member

    Old Upper Louisiana
    Midwestern USA English
    Maybe Algerians use the word خايب like Moroccans do on some occasions for bad or rotten things. I ask any native speakers if you could also use داز which means "passed" دازت الماكلة
     
  7. amelesperanza Senior Member

    málaga, Spain
    French, Spanish, arabic
    In Algeria we would rather say (more often), "al makla khasrat" or "al makla khamjet".
     
  8. Xence Senior Member

    Algeria (Arabic - French)
    al-makla fesdet/khasret/khamjet الماكلة فسدت/خسرت/خمجت


    I am not aware of such usages.
     
  9. A-class-act Senior Member

    Near to my luggage,and ready to travel.
    Arabic,and French"biracial boy"
    Xence, gave you the right words! al-makla fesdet/khasret/khamjet الماكلة فسدت/خسرت/خمجت
     
  10. hero04dz New Member

    arab , english , french
    الماكلة فاسدة / مارقة / عيانة / خامجة / ماشي مليحة / ...
     
  11. makandés66 Senior Member

    Old Upper Louisiana
    Midwestern USA English
    one more suggestion please let me know if this works, يا اصحابنا الجزائريين how about تسنّه I saw this in the hans weir and I think it has to do with the food passing its time...
     
  12. makandés66 Senior Member

    Old Upper Louisiana
    Midwestern USA English
    What about زنخ يزنَخ
    talking about turning rancid. Is this used in Algeria?
     
  13. Xence Senior Member

    Algeria (Arabic - French)
    The words in red only refer to a bad quality of the food.


    As far as I know, this verb is rather Classical Arabic (see Quran 2:259). I have never heard it in Algeria.

    I don't think so. In my area we use the verb خمل . Other words may be used in other areas, but I would be surprised to see زنخ among them.
     
  14. ajamiyya عجمية Junior Member

    USA
    American English
    Hello there. That's interesting. I know this root, with a shadda on the mim, as a word for cleaning/straightening up. For instance, you might say,"محال باش نخرج قبل ما نخمل ألكوزينا"
     
  15. Xence Senior Member

    Algeria (Arabic - French)
    Hi ajamiyya,

    That's also interesting. Would you mind to tell about the area where this is used.
    In my area, خمّل with a shadda means to collect stuff, for example رايح نخمّل قشّي/حوايجي.
     
  16. ajamiyya عجمية Junior Member

    USA
    American English
    Hello Xence et al,

    My apologies for the delay.

    Generally, I have heard this word used for "cleaning-up" by people from Casablanca and Rabat who are originally Riyyafa from the Hoceima area. Specifically, I remember hearing it used by an elderly lady who considered herself an original inhabitant of Casa, which, as we all know --while an old city-- has but recently developed into a major city. I couldn't tell you if the use is pervasive throughout Morocco.

    It does seem that the two meanings are correlated in that, when you straighten things up, you are gathering them, in a manner of speaking. It seems to me that جمع(ي) لقشاوش/لحوايج is the most common way I have heard people instruct others, as it were, to straighten-up/put away toys and clothes, but I may be wrong.

    Thank you.
     
  17. ajamiyya عجمية Junior Member

    USA
    American English
    Hello. This use of "food has passed" to mean "food is inedible" is not one with which I am familiar, in English. Nevertheless, it seems to me that دازت الماكلة is a calque for a more literal meaning of the verb "to pass". When I hear it, I imagine a tray of food floating through the air, passing somebody by.
     
  18. makandés66 Senior Member

    Old Upper Louisiana
    Midwestern USA English
    I have heard "pass" in the context that "the food is past its expiration date" or the "tomatoes are past their prime" which made me think that "the food has passed" was an expression used. True, if the context of expiration is clear, one could say it, but without it, it would never pass. :thumbsdown:
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2012
  19. tounsi51 Senior Member

    Dubai
    French-Arabic
    In Tunisia we use also خمّل and the same meaning as ajamiyya, for example, "n5amel ldar" (I am cleaning up the house)
     
  20. Xence Senior Member

    Algeria (Arabic - French)
    ajamiyya,

    Thanks for your response.
    It seems there is much to say about خمّل, but I am afraid we are going off topic here. :)
     

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