All Slavic languages: dialect comprehenision [audio/video]

Discussion in 'Other Slavic Languages' started by TriglavNationalPark, May 9, 2011.

  1. TriglavNationalPark

    TriglavNationalPark Senior Member

    Chicago, IL, U.S.A.
    Slovenian (a.k.a. Slovene)
    Two years ago, Jana337 opened THIS thread, which allowed foreros to post and comment on audio and video clips of various Slavic languages without preapproval from the moderators. At the time, Jana wrote: "Depending on the success of this thread, moderators may decide to open threads for dialects."

    Following a request by one of our foreros, we have now decided to do just that -- open a thread specifically for audio and video clips of dialects.

    The same general rules apply; here is a copy of Jana's original rules (slightly modified for this thread):

    Let's see how much of these dialects you can understand!

    EDIT: I've decided to allow clearly understandable songs if no other clips of a certain dialect are available.
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2011
  2. TriglavNationalPark

    TriglavNationalPark Senior Member

    Chicago, IL, U.S.A.
    Slovenian (a.k.a. Slovene)
  3. DenisBiH

    DenisBiH Senior Member

    The western Bosnia vernacular/dialect (of Cazinska Krajina), in a comedy show made in Cazin. There's quite a lot of Ikavian in there, and some 'strange' sounding vowels (and consonants, for that matter). I'm not a native of that region, so if a native of that region or someone else knows of a better depiction of this dialect, feel free to correct me. This dialect, or at least the pure form of it, is classified as bosansko-dalmatinski or mlađi ikavski.

    Example 1

    Example 2
    The second example is longer than the recommended length of 2-3 minutes. Since the first one is only a minute, could we have this one stay to even it out? There are many other clips of this comedy show, but many are less appropriate in terms of both content and language.
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2011
  4. DenisBiH

    DenisBiH Senior Member

    Kajkavian:
    A comedy show featuring what I suppose is Kajkavian from Međimurje - here. Perhaps someone from that area can comment on it.


    'Zagrebian':
    A debate from the parliament of the city of Zagreb featuring the mayor Milan Bandić addressing the representatives. There's some Kajkavian mixed in there, but that is mostly Shtokavian. Perhaps Croatian speakers can comment on the language here as well, in light of the recent debate about the vernacular of Zagreb - here is the video. That is not standard Shtokavian accentuation from what I can hear, not all of it anyway.

    If someone has better examples please do share, and I apologize is someone judges the content in the clips to be a bit too...humorous. I personally find it rather nice and relaxed.
     
    Last edited: May 11, 2011
  5. vianie Senior Member

    Slovak
    Last edited: May 25, 2011
  6. vianie Senior Member

    Slovak
  7. yael* Senior Member

    Perth WA
    Serbian
  8. DenisBiH

    DenisBiH Senior Member

    This documentary about the Bosniaks of Albania (originally from late 19th century settlers with some later arrivals) features several people speaking their Bosnian dialect(s) preserved until today. Not too different from the modern standard, but some dialectalisms and archaisms are present, as well as some influence of Albanian that I hear in the intonation. The marks are, roughly, 1:30, 3:30, 6:35 and 8:40 but there are five more parts.

    Some features I find interesting - the use of ali for ili and su for sa.
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2011
  9. itreius Senior Member

    Assembly
    Here's a video clip featuring some Bednja Kajkavian (bednjanski) along with subtitles in standard Croatian.
     
  10. yael* Senior Member

    Perth WA
    Serbian
    Amazing! I really needed subtitles here. :)
     
  11. yael* Senior Member

    Perth WA
    Serbian
    Now that you say that, su in lieu of sa is used in some Serbian dialects too.
     
  12. DenisBiH

    DenisBiH Senior Member

    An interview with Bosniaks of Turkey (environs of Istanbul and Izmir), settlers from 1878 and 1913. Some archaisms and dialectalisms, as in the case of Albania above, but remarkably similar to the modern language. Izmir is a traditional place where many Bosniaks settled, actually two of my great-grandfathers, one on my mother's side and one on my father's side are buried there, and I still have distant relatives there (but we don't have any contact with them for several decades now). On one occasion I was flying Turkish Airlines when a stewardess overheard us talking, approached us and started "Ja sam iz Bosne. A oklen ste vi?" :D
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2011
  13. DenisBiH

    DenisBiH Senior Member


    I can imagine it in su čim and possibly su kim, but it sounds quite rural, or at least very colloquial.
     
  14. yael* Senior Member

    Perth WA
    Serbian
    But dialects are colloquial, aren't they? And Serbia is a rural society... :)
    Oklen is also very common in northern (and rural) Serbian dialects.
     
  15. DenisBiH

    DenisBiH Senior Member


    Well yes, the language of immigrants would carry those now non-standard forms from the time when there was no stigma attached to them. For some of those people those may be the only forms they know. It's sweet. :)

    For us here some of those may survive as dialectal in some places, and some people may be proud of them as their local speech, but for the majority they would have the label of rural speech.

    Another example from the Turkey video: oto for to. It still survives in some vernaculars but is also sometimes mocked. Then there is oni for onaj in the Albanian video - that one I like to use as well when trying to sound "provincial" and/or archaic. :)
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2011
  16. yael* Senior Member

    Perth WA
    Serbian
    But isn't that sad? What's so bad in being rural? Should we really use seljak or ljakse to insult people? Farmer is a noble profession... Urban speech vs. rural speech - those labels should be equally respected.
    Sorry for the OT - just defending my rural background. :)
     
  17. DenisBiH

    DenisBiH Senior Member


    But we try to differentiate: seljak for farmers and seljačina for, well, you know. :D Joking aside, I personally have many friends from rural areas of Central Bosnia, so I don't harbor some negative sentiment.

    Yes it is sad. But the elimination of dialects in general is even sadder. Most people would for example associate Ikavian with Dalmatia. Some who are more "in the know" might add Bosanska Krajina and western Herzegovina. But few people would associate it with Central Bosnia, even though it is still present there, although repressed. A good friend of mine from a village near Gornji Vakuf is a native Ikavian speaker. He still has much pride in his dialect. And they use it among themselves in the village. But to people outside the village they speak the standard language, even if those outsiders are visiting the village. It's not like we would be unable to understand each other if they did speak in their dialect; at least we in B-H are homogenous enough language-wise no matter which dialect we have as native. Or take the example of my mother and her family, from Bosanska Krajina. I could only hear the vestiges of Ikavian in my late grandmother's speech, and even she was not fully Ikavian from what I can remember (perhaps in her youth she was). My mother is fully Ijekavian.

    So yes, the fact that we still look down on rural vernaculars with what remains in them of old dialectal features (sometimes only a little) is sad, but the fact that we "killed" or are in the process of finishing the "killing" of old dialects in general is sadder. Some may say, sadder still given the fact that they were once literary too.
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2011
  18. yael* Senior Member

    Perth WA
    Serbian
    Yes, of course, a typical a typical ljakse is rarely a farmer. Australians call them bogans, italians call them coatti or tamarri. But, we somehow decided to relate a certain culture and lifestyle to the rural environment. Maybe it's actually because we are such a rural country.

    I didn't know that ikavian was spoken out of Dalmatia. :(
    Elimination is sad. I love them, I have lived in many different places and had a possibility to learn well many dialects (mostly Italian). And I have learnt my dialect from my grandmother and my father. Anyhow, I think that the elimination of dialects in BCMS occurred almost naturally, it wasn't forced. But we didn't do much to preserve them.
     
  19. !netko! Junior Member

    Croatian, Croatia
    I heard this song again today, after several years, and thought it'd be good for this thread. It's a duet with one singer singing in Slovenian (the bald one) and one in the Chakavian dialect of Croatian (the long-haired one). I hope posting a song is okay - there are quite a few clips of Chakavian around, but the singing here is very clear and easier to follow than most of these clips, and I think the juxtaposition with Slovenian is interesting).


    Vlado Kreslin and Šajeta - Rulet

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pMWIAfX7EpY
     
  20. Vulcho Junior Member

    Bulgarian
    Here is a movie about a dialect spoken in Serbia - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PtauiNM_sSQ. It is from central Bulgaria and not very different from the standard, but it lacks all the russisms and archaisms that entered the language after the migration to Serbia.

    It is very difficult to find well-preserved dialects in Bulgaria itself, but I found this woman speaking very good Torlak - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9X42ERZfB7g.
     
  21. ilocas2 Senior Member

  22. Arath Senior Member

    Bulgaria
    Bulgarian
    The second video is a great example of the transitional dialects. Here some features different from standard Bulgarian:


    • plural feminine adjectives and nouns end in -е: чушке, седенкете, различне песне;
    • the reflex of big yus is /u/ not /ɤ/ - почну да се прай (почна да се прави), вечерту (вечертъ), стануло (станало), общинуту (общинътъ), осудиш (осъдиш), трепу (трепят), порасту му крила (порастат му крила);
    • first person, plural verbs end in -мо - отидемо, свиемо, смо йели;
    • personal pronouns он, она, га, гю instead of той, тя, го, я;
    • first person singular verbs end in -м - оженим (оженя), заведем (заведа);
    • accusative forms of feminine nouns - седенкюту, у общинуту;
    • lack of final in third person plural verbs - се месе, пуне се чушке (се месят, пълнят се чушки), трепу (трепят), порасту му крила (порастат му крила);
    • the consonant cluster -шт- is pronounced -ч - прачал (пращал), ночно време
    • third person plural aorist verbs end in -ше - свите се бише пребише (всичките се биха, пребиха), строшише (строшиха), отидоше у общинуту (отидоха в общината)
    The dialect from the first video has been heavily influenced by the Serbian language. If I didn't know I would never have guessed that that's the speech of people from Central Bulgaria, they have strong Serbian accent - no vowel reduction, the way they pronounce "l", words like мъртъв sound like мртъв.

    Both videos are perfectly intelligible to me.
     
  23. yael* Senior Member

    Perth WA
    Serbian
    The first one quite intelligible to me too, but Torlak is pretty hard (and too fast)... I am from North-west Serbia, I guess it should be much more familiar to people from South-east.
     
  24. Arath Senior Member

    Bulgaria
    Bulgarian
    Rupski dialect from the Rhodope Mountains, quite different from standard Bulgarian. Even native speakers need subtitles to understand it:

    http://youtu.be/_HmCanugtt0
     
  25. TriglavNationalPark

    TriglavNationalPark Senior Member

    Chicago, IL, U.S.A.
    Slovenian (a.k.a. Slovene)
    Here is a movie clip featuring the Prekmurje dialect of Slovenian -- a separate standard language until 1918, when the former Hungarian province of Vendvidék was united with other Slovenian-speaking areas, which had been a part of Austria:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H4zV_tUE9hI

    The clip has English subtitles.
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2011
  26. vianie Senior Member

    Slovak
  27. pawel_zet New Member

    Polish
    You will find many examples of Polish dialects on this page: http://www.gwarypolskie.uw.edu.pl
    For example, here is a dialect from Polish Podhale (near the border of Slovakia): http://www.gwarypolskie.uw.edu.pl/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=469&Itemid=43
    And - from the opposite corner of Poland - the dialect from northern Mazovia (Ostróda): http://www.gwarypolskie.uw.edu.pl/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=380&Itemid=29
    I must admit that these dialects even for me are not 100% intelligible.
     
  28. Azori

    Azori Senior Member

    Just a note: there's Czech in this video at (roughly) 2:01 (that blonde girl), 2:03 (a woman from the jury), 3:28 (a quite successful attempt to speak Czech).
     
  29. trance0 Senior Member

    Slovene
    I must say, surprisingly easy to understand. I could understand almost 100% of it.
     
  30. marco_2 Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
  31. Azori

    Azori Senior Member

  32. el_tigre Senior Member

    Orebić
    Croatian(štokavski+čakavski)
  33. Azori

    Azori Senior Member

  34. vianie Senior Member

    Slovak
  35. vianie Senior Member

    Slovak
  36. Kartof Senior Member

    Bulgarian & English
  37. vianie Senior Member

    Slovak
  38. iobyo Senior Member

    Bitola, Macedonia
    Macedonian
  39. vianie Senior Member

    Slovak
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2012
  40. ilocas2 Senior Member

  41. TriglavNationalPark

    TriglavNationalPark Senior Member

    Chicago, IL, U.S.A.
    Slovenian (a.k.a. Slovene)
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2012
  42. itreius Senior Member

    Assembly
    Here's an episode of Manjinski mozaik, a public television show about ethnic minorities. This particular episode is about the Ukrainian minority in Lipovljani, in Central Croatia. The area in which they live also has a substantial number of Czechs and Slovaks and is right on the border between Kajkavian and Štokavian. I'd be interested in hearing comments from Ukrainians about whether this is comprehensible to them and if so, whether it deviates a lot from standard Ukrainian (of which I have no knowledge).

    http://www.hrt.hr/enz/manjinski-mozaik/230024/
     
  43. marco_2 Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    For me it's a typical West Ukrainian dialect and though I'm not Ukrainian I understood everything and I guess the Ukrainians will also have no problem with understanding it. The characteristic phonetic feature of this particular dialect is the pronunciation of "l" like in Slovak or Croatian - it's also typical for the Ukrainian dialects of Carpathian Ruthenia, probably the impact of the neighbouring languages.
     
  44. ilocas2 Senior Member

  45. DarkChild Senior Member

    Bulgarian
    ^^

    I wanted to see if I would understand something. I didn't catch anything except for pod kontrolu. The rest is absolutely unintelligible to me :(
     
  46. 0ld New Member

    Ukrainian
    It's very close to the western Ukrainian dialects. Maybe a bit strange accent, but no problem to understand.
     
  47. 0ld New Member

    Ukrainian
    Transcarpathian dialect of Ukrainian

    youtube.com/watch?v=CXrD4aQq5wg

    Sometimes very hard to comprehend when she speaks too fast :)
     
  48. itreius Senior Member

    Assembly
    A request similar to the one I had before, this time for Czech speakers.

    http://www.hrt.hr/enz/manjinski-mozaik/235534/

    It's a group of Czech speakers around the city of Daruvar in Central Croatia.

    How does the accentuation sound to Czech speakers from Czech Republic? Could you pinpoint it to some particular region within Czech Republic? Or is it very different from "normal" Czech? Any specific features you notice?

    Thanks in advance.
     
  49. ilocas2 Senior Member

    It's quite strongly influenced by Croatian. They have rather strong accent. They are mixing Croatian words into Czech, so sometimes it's not understandable in Czech. Also grammar is often wrong. I watched some videos on Youtube from that area some time ago. The most distinctive feature which I noticed immediately is for me the pronunciation of č, š and ž which is different in Czech and in Croatian.

    Actually it was "pod kontrolou" but it doesn't matter. : )
     
  50. itreius Senior Member

    Assembly
    I figured as much. At times it seemed like they were pronouncing things the same way I would pronounce them (and I have minute knowledge of Czech). It also seemed to me like their specific Croatian dialectal background was recognizable (that is, which Croatian dialect they speak as native, apart from Czech language).
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2014

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