alliteration of "f"

Discussion in 'English Only' started by irene.acler, Sep 18, 2006.

  1. irene.acler Senior Member

    Trento - Italy
    Italiano
    Does anybody know what the meaning of the alliteration of "f" could be?
    In many touristic brochures for example they write: Fun For Families, Fun For Everyone and something like that...
    Generally speaking, the alliteration is meant to stress a particular idea...but in this case what kind of idea??

    Thank you very much!
     
  2. maxiogee Senior Member

    imithe
    I would disagree. Alliteration is a literary device which helps to make a phrase stick in the mind, or attract the eye.
     
  3. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Alliteration is a often used in promotional material like this.
    It has no particular significance.
    It is used because the writer believes it will make the point more convincingly or more memorably.
     
  4. irene.acler Senior Member

    Trento - Italy
    Italiano
    OK, thank you everybody!
     
  5. comsci

    comsci Senior Member

    Taiwan, Vancouver(B.C.) and the Rockies
    Mandarin, Taiwan(Yankees 40 Wang)
    You "filthy fool"! XD
     
  6. irene.acler Senior Member

    Trento - Italy
    Italiano
    Whay does it mean?:eek:
     
  7. comsci

    comsci Senior Member

    Taiwan, Vancouver(B.C.) and the Rockies
    Mandarin, Taiwan(Yankees 40 Wang)
    It illustrates an example of "alliteration". ;)
     
  8. Porteño Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    British English
    You dirty beast! You scruffy idiot!
     
  9. Iona Senior Member

    English England
    Does anyone out there remember 'drinka pinta milka day'-I think it was in a milk marketing TV advert donkey's years ago ( or should that be donkeys'?)
     
  10. Porteño Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    British English
    I certainly do, sometime in the 50s if I'm not mistaken. I think it's donkey's years, but I'm not absolutely sure.
     
  11. foxfirebrand

    foxfirebrand Senior Member

    The Northern Rockies
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    Technically, this is assonance, the music-like repetition of vowels. Alliteration involves consonants only.
    .
    .
     
  12. moirag Senior Member

    Spain
    English, England
    I was a toddler in the 50s. I'd say it was the 60s-70s, as I remember it well.
     
  13. Porteño Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    British English
    Trust foxfirebrand to come up with something interesting and 'new' to me.

    Yes, it could have been the early 60s moirag, I left the UK in 1965 but I remember it well.
     
  14. sky13 New Member

    Australia, English
    HI everyone,

    In Seamus Heaney's poem "Blackberry-Picking", alliteration of the letter "f" is used as follwed:

    "...when the bath was filled we found a fur,
    A rat-grey fungus..."

    What is it about the letter "f" that makes an image so repulsive?

    Thanks
     
  15. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Nothing at all - look at the earlier example of a fun-filled family holiday.
    Cynicism aside, there is nothing repulsive about that.
     
  16. Harry Batt

    Harry Batt Senior Member

    Minneapolis
    USA English
    I've always wondered about a song from the 1940s Foxfirebrand. At last you've given us assonance to Mares eat oats and does eat oats and little lambs eat ivy/ A kid'll eat ivey too/Wouldn't you?
     

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