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Always faithful to my scars/my war

Discussion in 'Lingua Latina (Latin)' started by Tests, Dec 19, 2013.

  1. Tests New Member

    Spanish
    Hey!


    Im going to make me a tattoo on the back surrounding one of my childhood scars, but im not sure how translate it correctly.

    "Semper Fidelis...."? i´d really apreciate translation for "scars" and "war".



    Thanks so much for help!
     
  2. Scholiast

    Scholiast Senior Member

    Reading, UK
    English - UK
    Hola Señor

    Yet another request for a tattoo motto - this is becoming big business here.

    "scar" is calcar, plural calcaria, just be careful about the grammar as the word will decline (if for example you want to say something like "by the scars" it will be calcaribus).

    "War" is bellum, but again you must take care with the ending. What do you really want your tattoo to say?

    Σ
     
  3. Tests New Member

    Spanish
    Thanks for you reply Scholiast!

    The meaning that I want to give the tattoo is -always faithful to "war" where I was born, be proud of the scars that physical and mental it left me as a sign of "keep moving foward", overcome. These scars serve as a witness of that "war" (my war) that will stay with me until I cease to exist and that it is this war that shaped me as a person. Hence the essence of the tattoo is "Always faithful to my scars."-
     
  4. Scholiast

    Scholiast Senior Member

    Reading, UK
    English - UK
    Greetings again then, Tests

    calcaribus semper fidelis would then have a suitable double meaning: "always faithful [that's the semper fidelis bit - but of course as a Spaniard you know that already] to the scars" with calcaribus understood in the dative case. But it can also be understood as "always faithful because of the scars", with calcaribus taken as an ablative.

    What a felicitous ambiguity!

    Seasonal greetings to all Latin lovers,

    Σ
     
  5. Tests New Member

    Spanish
    Thanks a lot again for your help Scholiast!

    The ambiguity looks nice!

    One last thing. "Semper fidelis calcaribus" would be gramatically right? or "Calcaribus semper fidelis" is the right one in gramatical and message?
     
  6. Scholiast

    Scholiast Senior Member

    Reading, UK
    English - UK
    Greetings

    I cannot for a minute imagine why you want to have yourself tattoed, but in terms of Latin style, for what you want...

    calcaribus semper fidelis

    will convey that constructive ambiguity.

    And provoke questions - I hope you'll remember enough of the Latin to explain to admirers.

    Σ
     

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