1. Girlnterrupted

    Girlnterrupted Senior Member

    Mexico City
    Mexican Spanish
    Hi guys,

    I'm looking for a way to say "amarrar" in English, with double meaning.

    Context:

    Delilah tells Samson "¿Cómo puedo amarrarte"? Referring to tying him up with ropes.

    Samson responds figuratively "¿Aún más?" Meaning that she has him tied up with her beauty.


    Would the word "tie up" work in English the way it does in Spanish?

    "How could I tie you up?" ---> "Even more?"

    I'd appreciate your suggestions.
     
  2. Chris K Senior Member

    Tacoma WA, US
    English / US
    "Tie down" might work:

    He didn't want to get married because he didn't want to be tied down.
     
  3. Girlnterrupted

    Girlnterrupted Senior Member

    Mexico City
    Mexican Spanish
    Thanks a lot, Chris K.
     
  4. Girlnterrupted

    Girlnterrupted Senior Member

    Mexico City
    Mexican Spanish
    By the way, just a question: what's the difference between tie up and tie down? Can they be used for the same things in most cases?
     
  5. Chris K Senior Member

    Tacoma WA, US
    English / US
    Usually not. There are a lot of nuances in the way they're used, both literally and metaphorically. In general tying down is about anchoring something to the ground, while tying up is usually about restraining something (or someone) to keep it from moving.
     
  6. Girlnterrupted

    Girlnterrupted Senior Member

    Mexico City
    Mexican Spanish
    Thank you. So why would tie down work in this case and not tie up?
     
  7. Chris K Senior Member

    Tacoma WA, US
    English / US
    Because "to be tied down" is the metaphor that's usually applied to monogamous relationships. You're tied down, so you can't stray.
     
  8. Girlnterrupted

    Girlnterrupted Senior Member

    Mexico City
    Mexican Spanish
    Ok, I see, but it still works in the sense of tying someone "down" with ropes?
     
  9. Chris K Senior Member

    Tacoma WA, US
    English / US
    Normally if you're speaking literally you tie someone "up."
     
  10. Girlnterrupted

    Girlnterrupted Senior Member

    Mexico City
    Mexican Spanish
    So it doesn't work?
     
  11. Chris K Senior Member

    Tacoma WA, US
    English / US
    You've lost me. What exactly?
     
  12. V-Rator Senior Member

    Spanish - Spain
    She wants to know if in English we could remotely say that someone is 'tied down'. As I am not an English native, I would say that it is extremely uncommon and you would always choose to say 'tie someone up', but I think they could understand you.
     
  13. Girlnterrupted

    Girlnterrupted Senior Member

    Mexico City
    Mexican Spanish
    --Ok, I see, but it still works in the sense of tying someone "down" with ropes?


    --Normally if you're speaking literally you tie someone "up."


    --Yes, the first sentence (by Delilah) she is speaking literally, so since you explained that literally you tie someone up, then using "tie down" would not make sense in the initial sentence. That's my question.
     
  14. Chris K Senior Member

    Tacoma WA, US
    English / US
    It would be very unusual for a person to be literally "tied down." Metaphorically it's common.
     
  15. Girlnterrupted

    Girlnterrupted Senior Member

    Mexico City
    Mexican Spanish
    Ok, that answers my question. Metaphorically it's acceptable... thanks.
     
  16. jsvillar Senior Member

    Madrid
    SP - SP
    I immediately though about tie up/down, so I went to WR Dictionary and saw that it wasn't a good option. But then I saw another possibility: how about Tie in?

    Now, as you can see I'm not English native, but I was thinking about something like this:
    "How could I tie you up?" ---> "Well, you've already tied me in."
    Your opinion?
     
  17. UltiMATE jugador

    UltiMATE jugador Senior Member

    New Jersey
    English-New Jersey, US
    The phrase "tied in" sounds very strange to me. I cannot think of a phrase that would ever merit this. The only time I would ever say "tied in" would be if something like rope or string is "tied in a knot" which is literally "atado en un nudo." There is no metaphorical expression that uses "tied in" as far as I know in American English.

    Any UK English speakers want to confirm?


     

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