1. kenritz Junior Member

    english united states
    I have a quick question. My girlfriend always calls herself "mi amorsito" I asked her since she is the lady, shouldn't she be amorsita. she said no, amorsito es correcto. Is that right because amor is a masculine word in general <<el amor?
     
  2. Jaén

    Jaén Senior Member

    São Paulo, Brasil
    México, español/portugués/inglés
    Yes, that's right.

    Amor = amorcito

    Casa = casita

    The strange here is she calling herself 'amorcito'. I imagine a situation like:

    Hola, Kneritz, habla "tu amorcito".

    Saludos!
     
  3. kenritz Junior Member

    english united states
    she erased her name out of my phone and replaced it with amorsito. She said she is my amorsito. she doesn't call herself mi amorsito. I assume that would mean she loves herself
     
  4. Jaén

    Jaén Senior Member

    São Paulo, Brasil
    México, español/portugués/inglés
    No, that's the way she expects/wishes/demands :)eek:) you to call her or acknowledge her ;)

    Saludos!

    Edit: BTW, the correct form is "amorcito".
     
  5. kenritz Junior Member

    english united states
    what is the significants of cito or sito. i thought it meant smaller
     
  6. Jaén

    Jaén Senior Member

    São Paulo, Brasil
    México, español/portugués/inglés
    Yes, 'cito' is the ending for the formation of diminutives. There are different rules acording to the ending of the word for the formation of diminutives in Spanish.
     
  7. mhp Senior Member

    American English
    Just to add to Jaén's excellent replies: -sito is a spelling error. Since Americans pronounce (ci) and (si) similarly, they make a lot of spelling errors in the (s) sound. Pretty much everyone (no matter from what country) makes spelling errors between (gi, ge) and (ji, je), (y) and (ll), (v) and (b).

    PS. Quite interestingly, most people that distinguish between the (ci) and (si) sound—i.e. Spaniards—deny the existence words that are spelled as (zi, ze).
     
  8. Jellby

    Jellby Senior Member

    Spanish (Spain)
    There are very few of them, but I don't think anyone believes "zigzag" is written with "c".
     
  9. cenriquet Senior Member

    Andalucía / Andalusia
    Spain/España
    PS. Quite interestingly, most people that distinguish between the (ci) and (si) sound—i.e. Spaniards—deny the existence words that are spelled as (zi, ze).

    Es una regla ortográfica: En español el sonido ce, ci se escribe con c y no con z. Naturalmente hay excepciones:


    Zinc/Cinc
    azimut/acimut
    Zelanda (En este caso no es válida la grafía Celanda:cross:)
    zigzag (Tampoco en este caso es válida la grafía cigzag:cross:)

    Seguro que hay más.

    Con respecto a mi amorcito, creo que podría traducirse como your honey, o your sweetheart. o cualquier otra cursilada de esas que se les ocurre a las mujeres :)
     
  10. mhp Senior Member

    American English
    To be exact, according to the DRAE there are 18 words in Spanish with orthography (ze) and 45 words with (zi). Admittedly, most of these are not very common words with a few notable exceptions such as “zeta”.

    I’m getting a bit off topic here, but how are the two Greek letters theta θ and zeta ζ written in Spanish?
     
  11. Jellby

    Jellby Senior Member

    Spanish (Spain)
    θ: zeta
    ζ: dseda
     
  12. Kangy Senior Member

    Buenos Aires, Argentina
    Argentina [Spanish]
    ^ I'm afraid I don't agree with that.
    In my opinion...

    θ: theta
    ζ: zeta
     
  13. mhp Senior Member

    American English
    Thank you. The DRAE also lists these as the correct words for these symbols.
     
  14. Idiomático Senior Member

    Virginia, USA
    Latin American Spanish
    Curioso. En mi diccionario de español cuento 32 palabras que comienzan con ze o zi. Dios sabe cuántas habrá con esas combinaciones de letras dentro de ellas.
     
  15. Jellby

    Jellby Senior Member

    Spanish (Spain)
    But those are not the Spanish names, they are not recognized in the DRAE, and their Spanish pronunciation would not correspond to the Greek sound. Actually, those are English transliterations of the Greek names (in what other language does "th" sound as θ?).

    By the way, μ and ν are "mi" and "ni" (and not "mu" and "nu") in Spanish, and χ is "ji" (not "chi").
     
  16. Kangy Senior Member

    Buenos Aires, Argentina
    Argentina [Spanish]
    ^ I know, but it's easier for me to devise the pronunciation.
    It's a way of standardizing the already messy and ever-changing method of romanization.
    You see, I use to romanize a lot of lyrics, so I need some system that most people find easy to get.
     
  17. mhp Senior Member

    American English
    The count that I gave in post #10 includes occurrence of these letter combination at any position in a word--initial, middle and end.
     
  18. Jellby

    Jellby Senior Member

    Spanish (Spain)
    That's one thing and Spanish names are a different thing.

    If you want to transcribe the Greek name for θ, you can write "theta".
    If you want to write the Spanish name for θ, you should write "zeta".
     

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