and later

Discussion in 'English Only' started by azz, May 3, 2013.

  1. azz Senior Member

    armenian
    Can one use:
    a. Tom and Tina went to the movies and made out.
    instead of:
    b. Tom and Tina went to the movies and later made out.

    Is (a) clear enough? Doesn't it give the impression that they made out at the movies? I think an adverb (either "later" or "afterwards" or "then") is absolutely necessary, or else the sentence will give the wrong impression. Maybe there are cases where an adverb would not be necessary. I am sure there are. But here, the reader would misunderstand the meaning of the sentence if there is no adverb that clarifies the order of events.... That is how I feel about it... But maybe I am wrong?

    Many thanks.
     
  2. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    They're both fine. You haven't really told us what you want your sentence to mean ... just given me the impression you don't think it's possible to make out at the movies.
     
  3. azz Senior Member

    armenian
    Thank you Copyright,

    No, I do know that is possible. But I thought that was what the first one meant and I did not want it to mean that.

    Cheers,
    Azz
     
  4. JustKate

    JustKate Moderate Mod

    The first one does give the impression that they made out at the movies. It doesn't actually say so, and it could be interpreted to mean that they did two separate things: (1) went to the movies and (2) made out. But if I read this sentence without any further context, I'd assume they made out at the movies.
     
  5. chasfh Senior Member

    Chicago, IL
    English - US
    a) means they made out while at the movies.
    b) means they went to the movies, and then afterwards went someplace else and made out.
     

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