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antwacky

Discussion in 'English Only' started by ewie, Dec 27, 2009.

  1. ewie

    ewie Senior Member

    This septic isle!
    NW Englandish English
    I'm currently listening to Paul O'Grady on the radio. He described something as antwacky ~ "That's a Liverpool word that means old-fashioned".
    What a brilliant word♥♥♥
    source

    Anyone heard this one before? know how current it is? care to adopt it?
     
  2. sdgraham

    sdgraham Senior Member

    Oregon, USA
    USA English
    Anyone heard this one before? :thumbsdown:
    know how current it is? :eek:
    care to adopt it? :thumbsdown:
     
  3. Loob

    Loob Senior Member

    English UK
    Anyone heard this one before? :thumbsdown:
    know how current it is? :confused:
    care to adopt it? YesYesYess - I love it!:):):)
     
  4. hotpocket

    hotpocket Senior Member

    Douarnenez dans le Finistère
    American English / Boston
    Anyone heard this one before? :( :thumbsdown: :(
    know how current it is? ???
    care to adopt it? sorry, but NO :( :thumbsdown: :(
     
  5. JulianStuart

    JulianStuart Senior Member

    Sonoma County CA
    English (UK then US)
    Great word:)
    Sounds a little too wacky to adopt as meaning "old" :thumbsdown:
    Sorrie ewie :confused:
     
  6. cuchuflete

    cuchuflete Senior Member

    Maine, EEUU
    EEUU-inglés
    Anyone heard this one before? :thumbsdown:
    know how current it is? :confused:
    care to adopt it? Thanks no. I've already got strange relatives*. :eek:






    * Uncle Ewie and lovely Niece Loob, just to name a couple of the more egregiously
    eccentric ones.

     
  7. Loob

    Loob Senior Member

    English UK
    Nice pun, Uncle Cuckoo.
    :cool:
     
  8. ewie

    ewie Senior Member

    This septic isle!
    NW Englandish English
    Oh I think you're all rotters. Except niecikins, of course.
     
  9. Malti Junior Member

    Devonlish
    I have heard it before, although I had no idea what it meant really (I did guess along the lines of "kitschy") and didn't want to use it if I had misunderstood and would sound stupid misusing it. I like it though, it's a very fun word to say.
     
  10. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I've never heard antwacky, but I have often heard antikway ... probably from the same people who mischievously pronounce picturesque as picture-skew.
     
  11. cuchuflete

    cuchuflete Senior Member

    Maine, EEUU
    EEUU-inglés
    Is your antikway what my dear mother called an anti-cue? You know, something old and dusty with a high price tag, like Unkie Ewester.
     
  12. ewie

    ewie Senior Member

    This septic isle!
    NW Englandish English
    Yes, I've heard both of those two too, Panjoo. I wonder what is causing our three transatlantic cousins above to be so very agin antwack ... ?

    EDIT: after Young Mr.Flete ~ beg your pardon: anti-cue is what I've heard, as well as picture-skew.
     
  13. cuchuflete

    cuchuflete Senior Member

    Maine, EEUU
    EEUU-inglés
    Antwack sounds like a slap at the lady with the antimacassars who insisted on being kissed, smelled like dust, but was a good dispenser of candies to small boys with dirty knees. It also sounds a little like anthrax, which is scary stuff.
     
  14. AngelEyes Senior Member

    English - United States
    Antwacky sounds like it's springtime and you've got armies of those little black critters crawling on your kitchen counters and looking for anything sweet that might have dripped, like ice cream or pickle juice.

    Those pesky ants are enough to drive you nuts - wacky.

    Meaning: old-fashioned? NOT...or nowt.

    AngelEyes
     
  15. JulianStuart

    JulianStuart Senior Member

    Sonoma County CA
    English (UK then US)
    Auntie Kway and Auntie Kew would both be understood as past their prime, but Auntie Wacky could be quite young :D
     

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