ao final vs. no final

Discussion in 'Português (Portuguese)' started by pepino23, Apr 25, 2014.

  1. pepino23 Senior Member

    USA
    English-United States
    Porque as coisas mudam, mas ao final isso não é bem nem mau, só é a vida.

    I am trying to say: Because things change, but in the end that is neither good nor bad, it is just life. I have a doubt as to whether my translation makes sense. Specifically with whether it should be "ao final" or "no final." Obrigada!
     
  2. machadinho

    machadinho Senior Member

    Ancient Brazilian Portuguese
    Either way is fine. But I say no fim.
    Or informally: no fim das contas
     
  3. pepino23 Senior Member

    USA
    English-United States
    Is "fim" a more common way to express an ending rather than "final"?
     
  4. AlexSantos Junior Member

    Rio de Janeiro - Brazil
    Portuguese - Brazil
    I don't see that much of a difference between "no fim" and "ao fim". The former sounds more natural for native speakers but both options are correct nevertheless. If anything, I'd say that "ao fim" sounds somewhat more formal than "no fim".

    What is not correct, however, is the use of bem (adverb) instead of bom (adjective).

    Porque as coisas mudam, mas ao final isso não é bom nem mau, só é a vida.
     
  5. machadinho

    machadinho Senior Member

    Ancient Brazilian Portuguese
    They are both common. For some people, fim (the end) is a noun whereas final (final exam) is an adjective.
    Most people just ignore this distinction. the weekend: o fim de semana or o final de semana.
     
  6. AlexSantos Junior Member

    Rio de Janeiro - Brazil
    Portuguese - Brazil
    I'd not go so far as to say that one is more common than the other. Both words mean the same thing and may be used interchangeably in everyday speech.
     
  7. pepino23 Senior Member

    USA
    English-United States
    Gotcha! Thanks for the clarification! :thumbsup:
    So if I were to change "ao final" to "no fim" would bem still need to be changed to bom? (Sorry bem and bom confuse me constantly!!)
     
  8. AlexSantos Junior Member

    Rio de Janeiro - Brazil
    Portuguese - Brazil
    You need to use the adjective regardless of whether you use "ao/no final" or "ao/no fim"

    If you take a look at the same sentence in English, you'll notice that it follows the very same structure:

    Because things change, but in the end that is neither good (adj.) nor bad (adj.), it is just life.
    Porque as coisas mudam, mas ao final isso não é bom (adj.) nem mau (adj), só é a vida.

    bom and mau mean good and bad whereas bem and mal mean well and badly which are adverbs and thus do not conform to the above rule.

     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2014
  9. pepino23 Senior Member

    USA
    English-United States
    Ahhh okay okay now it makes more sense! Thank you!!
     
  10. Joca

    Joca Senior Member

    Florianópolis, Brazil
    Brazilian Portuguese
    Hmm, só quero acrescentar uma coisa.... Prefiro dizer: é só a vida, em lugar de só é a vida.
     
  11. Galisisk New Member

    portuguese
    In this case 'In the end' is an isolated expression, not subortinated to anything, so you can use both 'no/ao final'. But if the expression is linked to an verb, it will be required to use the preposition demanded by the verb.

    Some examples:

    Estou no final dos meus estudos. (Estar + em - sentido temporal/local) (I am at the end of my studies.)
    Estou assistindo ao final do jogo. (Assistir + a - sentido de ver) (I am watching the end of the game.)

    Similar words and expressions:

    Afinal: adverb 'after all'
    Qual a sua idade afinal? (How old are you after all?)

    A final: it can be the noun 'Final' plus preposition 'a' and without the definite article 'o'. I couldn't find any example for this. But 'final' can also be a feminine word, when used as a final match (sports)
    A final do campeonato. (The final match of the championship)

    A fim: fixed expression (in order to)
    Dirigi rápido a fim de chegar a tempo. (I drove fast in order to arrive just in time.)

    Afim: adverb (to be into something / to feel like doing something / to want)
    Estou afim de sair. (I want to go out)
    Eu sou muito afim de fazer isso! (I am so into doing that!)
    Estou afim de dançar. (I feel like dancing.)
     

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