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apostillar

Discussion in 'Legal Terminology' started by berosal, Dec 10, 2010.

  1. berosal New Member

    mexican spanish
    Hola, estoy haciendo una traducción y quería su opinion sobre los términos que estoy usando:
    "Copia certificada reciente del acta de nacimiento de cada uno de los contrayentes debidamente apostillada y traducida al español por un perito autorizado por el gobierno del Estado de Michoacán".

    Recent Bride and groom´s birth certificate registered copy, apostille and translated to spanish by a Michoacan´s State goverment expert.

    Gracias!!
     
  2. aguanapeich Senior Member

    Madrid
    Spanish - Spain
    No es totalmente exacto, pero para que se entienda yo normalmente utilizo en mi correspondencia "que lleve la apostilla de la Convención de la Haya" que me imagino que es a lo que hace referencia, lo que se diría "bearing the apostille of the Hague Convention".

    1 abr,

    G.
     
  3. David Senior Member

    Copia certificada reciente del acta de nacimiento de cada uno de los contrayentes debidamente apostillada y traducida al español por un perito autorizado por el gobierno del Estado de Michoacán".

    A recently certified copy of the birth certificate of each of the contracting parties [or each of the prospective spouses], duly sealed with the [appropriate] apostille and translated into Spanish by an expert [translator] authorized by the government of the State of Michoacan
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2010
  4. zumac Senior Member

    Mexico City
    USA: English & Spanish
    A certified copy and the corresponding apostille can only be issued by the Secretary of State of the US state where the subject was born.

    You cannot get a document apostilled at the US Embassy nor at a US Consulate, nor at a Mexican Consulate. You or an authorized representative must ultimately appear in person before the Secretary of State of the state where the document was originally issued.

    I would assume that a similar requirement applies to the Mexican state for subjects born in Mexico.

    In the case given, the role of the state of Michoacán is only for authorizing the translations into Spanish, in addition to requiring the apostilled documents.

    I'm an American living in Mexico. I was born in New York City, and it took me 4 months to get an apostilled copy of my birth certificate. The procedure is not for the lighthearted.

    Saludos.
     
  5. berosal New Member

    mexican spanish
    Thanks for sharing your knowledge, it was of great help!
    berosal
     
  6. cirrus

    cirrus Senior Member

    Warwick
    UK English
    Apostille? Does that word really exist in English? It sounds very translated to my ears. Authenticated or notarised might be a better bet.
     
  7. PAEscritora

    PAEscritora Junior Member

    Akron, Penn.
    English
    Apostille does exist! I had to get several documents apostilled when I went to live in Colombia. Basically what it is is a document that says the notary who notarized the document is legitimate. You take your notarized document to the State Capital and for a small fee, they apostille (authenticate) the notary.
     
  8. cirrus

    cirrus Senior Member

    Warwick
    UK English
    I'm still not convinced the word exists in the real world. I can imagine the authorities authenticating an already authenticated document. ¡Vaya papeleo! I wonder whether we might translate apostillar with paying money for old rope. ;-)

    Just come across this on the Foreign Office website. It talks about legalisation of documents or providing an apostille. "The Legalisation Office at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office is the only competent authority in the UK to provide an apostille service (according the the requirements of the Hague Convention of 5th October 1961 abolishing the requirement of legalisation for foreign public documents) and to deliver a legalisation service to those countries not party to the convention. "
     
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2010
  9. PAEscritora

    PAEscritora Junior Member

    Akron, Penn.
    English
  10. zumac Senior Member

    Mexico City
    USA: English & Spanish
    Note:
    "Under the Hague Convention, signatory countries have agreed to recognize public documents issued by other signatory countries if those public documents are authenticated by the attachment of an internationally recognized form of authentication known as an "apostille." The apostille ensures that public documents issued in one signatory country will be recognized as valid in another signatory country".

    The above recognition of apostilled documents was extremely helpful for frequent international travellers and members of the foreign service of countries who are members of the Hague Convention. Prior to this, frequent international travellers or a member of a foreign service needed to have authenticated documents according to the rules of each country to be visited.

    Saludos.
     
  11. cirrus

    cirrus Senior Member

    Warwick
    UK English
    I'd be interested if you could quote the source for this because my reading of this is that it directly contradicts the guidance from the Foreign Office. I absolutely hated this sort of endless paper shuffling when I was in Colombia.

    Compare "Under the Hague Convention, signatory countries have agreed to recognize public documents issued by other signatory countries if those public documents are authenticated by the attachment of an internationally recognized form of authentication known as an "apostille.""

    with "The Legalisation Office at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office is the only competent authority in the UK to provide an apostille service (according the the requirements of the Hague Convention of 5th October 1961 abolishing the requirement of legalisation for foreign public documents) and to deliver a legalisation service to those countries not party to the convention."
     
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2010
  12. zumac Senior Member

    Mexico City
    USA: English & Spanish
    I've been trying to find the document in Google where I obtained the above quote, but, sad to say, I can't find it again. Sorry.

    In general, I'm not familiar how the Hague Convention handles countries not party to the convention. I would say that this is beyond the scope of this thread.

    Saludos.
     
  13. litiga8or

    litiga8or Senior Member

    Oregon, USA
    Rainy Oregon! USA
    In the real world? Maybe not. But in the LEGAL WORLD -- Yes! The word APOSTILLE does exist in English. It's different from an authentication or a notarization.
     
  14. cirrus

    cirrus Senior Member

    Warwick
    UK English
    To me they seem pretty much the same thing, albeit done by different people. What they have in common is that they certify that a document is legitimate.

    By the way, there's no need to shout. Caps lock looks a tad untidy quite apart from anything else.
     
  15. aguanapeich Senior Member

    Madrid
    Spanish - Spain
    they are not the same. to put it in a nutshell, the notary or public authority certifies that the document is legitimate (in continental Europe and other jurisdictions more than this). The apostille actually establishes that the person identifiing himself as notary or authority does in fact hold such position.

    When a country is not a member of the Hague Convention, the only way to do this is by means of a diplomatic legalization procedure which is very long and requires that the document is reviewed and sealed by many authorities.

    KR

    G
     
  16. litiga8or

    litiga8or Senior Member

    Oregon, USA
    Rainy Oregon! USA
    Ok. I get the message. I won't use caps anymore. ;-)
     

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