Apply to / apply for

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Grammar / Gramática Español-Inglés' started by ligarashi, Dec 15, 2008.

  1. ligarashi Junior Member

    São Paulo
    Portuguese (Brazilian)
    I wanna know if Apply to and apply for are both correct. If not, which is accepted by grammar? If yes, what`s the difference between them?

    Thanks a lot, guys!

    Best regards!
     
  2. phosphore Senior Member

    Serbian
    Both are correct. You could apply to a college, but you could as well apply for a college and later you would apply for a job. Anyway, there is some difference in meaning.
     
  3. Tazzler Senior Member

    Maryland
    American English
    Apply for is solicitar.

    I applied for the job. I applied for a permit.

    Apply something to something is aplicar algo a algo/dedicar algo a algo.

    I applied the rule to everyone. He applies paint to the bench. We apply our knowledge to solving the problem.

    I hope this helps.
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2008
  4. jeterinmicipen Senior Member

    Madrid
    Castilian
    great Tazzler It couldn't be clearer
     
  5. ligarashi Junior Member

    São Paulo
    Portuguese (Brazilian)
    Ok, that`s fine. I got it. Just one thing, according to this site, apply for means "candidatar-se", in English "try to get sth". Solicitar is "to request" or "ask for sth". Be careful.

    Thanks anyway, that helped a lot!

    Best regards!:)
     
  6. Tazzler Senior Member

    Maryland
    American English
    I was actually referring to Spanish ;), though the Spanish-Portuguese dictionary lists the word as complete cognates.

    Actually, I made a mistake. You say apply to college. But as far as I know, solicitar's translation takes for, at least when solicitar is transitive. You can't say apply a permit. Aplicar takes to whether it's transitive or not.
     
  7. ligarashi Junior Member

    São Paulo
    Portuguese (Brazilian)

    Oh, I see! Hehe. ;). That`s fine!
    Best regards!
     
  8. dtbrooklyn Junior Member

    English - US
    It seems to me the question is about English grammar not Spanish, right?

    I would say "I am applying for a job, for a position, for a scholarship," i.e. what I am applying for is a position or spot that I hope to obtain.

    On the other hand, I would say "I am applying to a university, to a program" i.e. what i am applying to is the school or program or business which is offering something.
     
  9. ligarashi Junior Member

    São Paulo
    Portuguese (Brazilian)
    Brillant! It couldn`t be clearer... Thanks a lot!
     
  10. Gandiense New Member

    Madrid
    English -UK
    To simplify:

    Apply for "something"
    Apply to "somebody" ( legal or physical person)
     
  11. ilikedafishy New Member

    U.S.
    english
    Alright, so how would you say "I applied to the University of so-and-so?"
     
  12. milimltn New Member

    Spanish
    Well, I had the same question some minutes ago. And after reading this forum, I still didn't have a clear view of the two.
    I made my research and, putting things together, this is what I found:

    Apply for, according to Wordreference, means when you make a formal request to obtain something. In other words, you apply for something you want to obtain, receive, such as: a job, money, a visa, etc.

    On the other hand, Apply to, according to Wordreference, means when you make a formal request to someone. In other words, you ask formally someone.

    For instance:

    A. I will apply for the visa tomorrow. (It means: I will ask formally to obtain the visa.)

    B. Tim's applied to the USA embassy. (It means: Tim has made a formal request to the USA Embassy)

    Note: We can have both expression in one single sentence, as found in Cambridge Dictionary. Here it is the example:

    C. We've applied to a charitable organization for a grant for the project. (It means: We have asked formally a Charitable Organization in order to get a grant for the project)

    C.1. We've applied to a charitable organization.
    C.2. We've applied for a grant for the project.

    There you are!

    I hope this helps. If you have any question, or suggestion, I'm very open to hear those.
    :D
     
  13. ezio13997 New Member

    Hindi and English
    can we use it like..."this rule does not apply for you?"
     
  14. murathison

    murathison Senior Member

    Hanóver, Alemania
    Alemán, Alemania
    Yes. :thumbsup:

    Also possible is "This rule does not apply to you." Explanation:

    "This rule does not apply for you" -> You are not included in the group of people which need to comply with this rule.
    "This rule does not apply to you" -> You are not included in the subject of the rule (if you get my point)


    Examples:

    "Nobody can come through this door" --> This rule does not apply for you, come on through

    "All teachers have to wear a hat at all times" --> This rule does not apply to you (to English teachers for example is also possible) (for you is also possible) --> Here "to you" emphazises the person being one of the teachers.


    Natives, please correct me should I be wrong. Thank you.


    Greets.
     
  15. ezio13997 New Member

    Hindi and English
    thanks a lot....so can i frame a sentence like.... "This rule does not apply for you as you are less than eighteen years old"?
     
  16. Bill Osler

    Bill Osler Senior Member

    North Carolina, USA
    English, USA
    I think that your meaning is clear in this case, but I would never say it that way. I would say "This rule does not apply to you ...". The example from murathison sounds artificial to me.
     
  17. ezio13997 New Member

    Hindi and English
    hey there bill....i believe murathison is pretty right....as for is often used by people...i have heard it...adding onto that...colloquially..for statements concerning age group...for sounds better than to....
     
  18. Bill Osler

    Bill Osler Senior Member

    North Carolina, USA
    English, USA
    Certainly the phrase "for you" or "as for you" can be used in some contexts. I don't think that this is one of them. Caveat: My experience is mostly limited to "American" English (in my case specifically the versions in the Western and Southeastern US) and usage is sometimes different in other places.

    You COULD say "As for you, the rule does not apply because ..." or something to that effect.
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2015
  19. ezio13997 New Member

    Hindi and English
    i think as said by murathison....."This rule does not apply for you" -> You are not included in the group of people which need to comply with this rule.
    it does make some sense i believe...as it concerns age group....don't you think??
     
  20. Bill Osler

    Bill Osler Senior Member

    North Carolina, USA
    English, USA
    I agree that it would be understood and it does not violate any rules of grammar. I just don't recall hearing a native speaker use that construction. I think I would always use "to": "This rule does not apply to you."
    On the other hand, I don't think I would ever say "To you this rule does not apply." I might say "As for you, this rule does not apply" or "In your case this rule does not apply." I might even say "For you this rule does not apply." but I think that last example would be unusual. I don't know why the order makes a difference in how I perceive the "naturalness" of the phrasing.
     
  21. ezio13997 New Member

    Hindi and English
    @ bill....for sounds right colloquially....doesn't it?
     
  22. Bill Osler

    Bill Osler Senior Member

    North Carolina, USA
    English, USA
    I don't think I have ever heard "This rule does not apply for you." or a similar construction even colloquially but I suppose it is possible.
     
  23. robertj New Member

    English - USA
    Is it incorrect to say "I applied at the University of Michigan."? This sounds correct to my ear. I think it is more common to say "applied to" in this context but "applied at" also sounds correct to me. What do you think?
     
  24. ezio13997 New Member

    Hindi and English
    You are absolutely right Robert. ..applying at or applying to the university of michigan are both right
     

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