At least where I come from

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by sakvaka, Sep 13, 2013.

  1. sakvaka

    sakvaka Moderoitsija

    "At least where I come from" is an English expression which means that a habit or a custom is very common in the speaker's home country, but (apparently) not in the speaker's current place of residence. It can also express surprise or disappointment with the local cultural environment. Examples:

    —This morning, my neighbour didn't say hello to me. At least where I come from, neighbours always say hello to one another.
    —Why do you trust authorities? At least where I come from, people never trust authorities.

    How do you say it in Italian? The first expression that crossed my mind, "Almeno da dove vengo io", sounds clumsy, but is it?

    "Stamattina il mio vicino non mi ha salutato. ?????, i vicini si salutano sempre."

    Thanks!
     
  2. dôghen Senior Member

    italiano
    Ciao sakvaka, "almeno da dove vengo io" is not clumsy in italian, it sounds and is right.
    Another form, in fact a little more current, is: "al mio paese" (sometimes capitalized).
    "Stamattina il mio vicino non mi ha salutato. Almeno, al mio paese, i vicini si salutano sempre."
     
  3. curiosone

    curiosone Senior Member

    Romagna, Italy
    AE - hillbilly ;)
    I just wanted to point that it's the "at least" (or "almeno") that can give "where I come from" a sense of disappointment, or negative comparison with wherever things are different (than what one is accustomed to). By itself, "where I come from" can also be used simply to compare one's usual habitat with where one is (even when travelling, and not necessarily implying a change of residence).
     
  4. Pincadilly Junior Member

    The Netherlands
    Italiano
    I also use "a casa mia" with the same meaning as "al mio paese".
     
  5. curiosone

    curiosone Senior Member

    Romagna, Italy
    AE - hillbilly ;)
    There's also "Dalle mie parti"
     
  6. Holymaloney

    Holymaloney Senior Member

    Italy
    English (UK) / Italian - bilingual
    Maybe also '...(almeno) da noi usa fare così...' (not sure if that's the correct way though :eek: )
     
  7. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
    That's how I'd say it
     
  8. GavinW Senior Member

    Italy
    British English
    Shouldn't that be: "almeno da noi si usa fare così"?
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2013
  9. Holymaloney

    Holymaloney Senior Member

    Italy
    English (UK) / Italian - bilingual
    Hi Gavin :)
    Dunno, that's what I wasn't sure about :(. I've actually heard it both ways (but I see Paul's ticked it as being correct ;))
     
  10. squigot New Member

    Italian
    No GavinW, I reckon your sentence is correct, but I'd say just like saying "da noi si usa così" or "da noi usa fare così". Not sure why, though.
    Anyway I can tell you the second is rare.
     
  11. GavinW Senior Member

    Italy
    British English
    OK, thanks Squig!
    (EDIT: And you too Holy!)
    (EDIT1: And... er you too, doghen!) :tick:
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2013
  12. dôghen Senior Member

    italiano
    So sakvaka you don't fell short of choices...
    "da noi"
    "dalle mie parti"
    "a casa mia"
    "al mio paese"
    "da dove vengo"
    this abundance may be revealing of the way Italians feel about home...:)

    It can be both Gavin. The form "usa" impersonal without "si" is accepted. It's rather literary but not rare.

    EDIT Squigot sorry for crossing
     

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