at the side of the room

Discussion in 'French-English Vocabulary / Vocabulaire Français-Anglais' started by Elody, Nov 11, 2007.

  1. Elody Junior Member

    Paris
    France, French
    Hello everyone ! I can't find the expression "at the side of" in a dictionnary. In the sentence "He was sitting in a chair at the side of the room", does it mean "dans un coin de la pièce" ? Thanks for your answers.
     
  2. Franglais1969

    Franglais1969 Senior Member

    Angleterre.
    English English, français rouillé
    Hello,

    I am more inclined to think of "coin" as corner. What about au côté de?
     
  3. Elody Junior Member

    Paris
    France, French
    Thanks for your answer Franglais1969. But what do you think "au côté de la pièce" could mean ?
     
  4. Franglais1969

    Franglais1969 Senior Member

    Angleterre.
    English English, français rouillé
    Personally I would think it would mean at/to the side of the room.

    Maybe I am incorrect, and the French don't use it that way.

    To me "dans un coin" means "in a corner," which isn't the same thing.
     
  5. Ayoup Senior Member

    France, Français
    Could it possibly mean "sur le côté" ? Nah it's wierd when speaking of a room.
     
  6. Ayoup Senior Member

    France, Français
    But, just to clarify, does that mean that the person is sitting next to one of the wall of the room?
     
  7. Franglais1969

    Franglais1969 Senior Member

    Angleterre.
    English English, français rouillé
    I would assume so yes, (judging by the context given).

    If not, I would use vers le côté, (de la pièce).
     
  8. Elody Junior Member

    Paris
    France, French
    Thanks to both of you. Now I have understood what the English meant. Still, "assis dans un fauteuil sur le côté de la pièce" does not sound very French to me... I'll think about it.
     
  9. clairet

    clairet Senior Member

    London & Bordeaux
    England & English (UK version)
    assis...près du mur?
     
  10. Cath.S.

    Cath.S. Senior Member

    Bretagne, France
    français de France
    It makes sense, Clairet! :thumbsup:
    Maybe près d'un mur, since we may safely assume there are several walls in the room.

    I would have suggested à l'écart.
     
  11. Elody Junior Member

    Paris
    France, French
    Thanks Clairet, I had'nt thought about that option ! Or what about "le long du mur" ?
     
  12. Franglais1969

    Franglais1969 Senior Member

    Angleterre.
    English English, français rouillé
    Surely that would mean the length of the wall?
     
  13. marget Senior Member

    It sounds good to me. I think it means "along the wall".
     
  14. Elody Junior Member

    Paris
    France, French
    You're right egueule, there are several walls in a room, so maybe I should rather say "le long d'un mur" ? Thanks too marget, and Franglais1969, "le long du mur" simply means "next to the wall" and does necessarily imply that the thing that is "le long du mur" covers all its surface.
     
  15. Franglais1969

    Franglais1969 Senior Member

    Angleterre.
    English English, français rouillé
    Bon. Thank you for the clarification.
     
  16. Elody Junior Member

    Paris
    France, French
    You're welcome ! :)
     
  17. Cath.S.

    Cath.S. Senior Member

    Bretagne, France
    français de France
    Le long du mur s'emploie différemment et contient l'idée de parcourir une distance :
    Une guirlande courait le long du mur.
    Les condamnés étaient alignés le long du mur avant d'être fusillés.
     
  18. J.F. de TROYES Senior Member

    francais-France
    What do you think of "assis tout près de la pièce" ? ( "at his side" can be translated " à ses côtés", what means the same as "tout à côté de lui" or "tout près de lui").
     
  19. Cath.S.

    Cath.S. Senior Member

    Bretagne, France
    français de France
    This suggests he is close to the room but not actually inside it.
     
  20. marget Senior Member

    Do you mean "tout près du mur"?
     
  21. clairet

    clairet Senior Member

    London & Bordeaux
    England & English (UK version)
    didn't Egeule's "à l'écart" fit?
     
  22. J.F. de TROYES Senior Member

    francais-France
    No, I meant "close to the room", but I confess the phrase puzzles me ! Now I tend to think Egueule is right.
     

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