at Whitsuntide

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Allegro molto, Jul 31, 2013.

  1. Allegro molto Senior Member

    Japanese
    Hello

    In Manchester during the 17th century the Kersal Moor Whit races were the great event of the year when large numbers of people turned the area into a giant fairground for several days. With the coming of industrialisation it became convenient to close down whole towns for a week in order to clean and maintain the machinery in the mills and factories. The week of closure, or wakes week, was often held at Whitsuntide.
    (from Whitsun, Wikipedia)
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whitsun#cite_note-Jones-1

    Does 'at Whitsuntide' mean '6th ~ 8th, April' as of 2014?

    Thank you
     
  2. dadane Senior Member

    New Zealand
    English (London/Essex)
    No. As the article explains, it is the week following Whitsun. Whitsun is the seventh Sunday after Easter. By my calculations that makes it the week beginning 8th May 2014.

    Did you misinterpret the term 'the seventh Sunday after Easter,' because you seem to have added 7 days from the 2013 date, instead of 7 weeks from the 2014 one?
     
  3. dadane Senior Member

    New Zealand
    English (London/Essex)
    Actually, I'm not :eek:, I typed the wrong date, it's the 8th June 2014 not 8th May.
     
  4. EnglishLearner1990

    EnglishLearner1990 Junior Member

    Iran
    Persian
    I'm sorry.:D
    Yes, it's the 8th June 2014
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2013
  5. Allegro molto Senior Member

    Japanese
    Thank you very much, EnglishLearner1990 and dadane

    A very convenient website, Ask.com! :)
     
  6. natkretep

    natkretep Moderato con anima

    Singapore
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    To steer the discussion back to the label, Whitsuntide usually refers to Whitsunday and the two days after. I think the term is getting old fashioned, and I'm more likely to hear the term Pentecost Sunday rather than Whitsun or Whitsunday.

    Your article refers to the 17th century - we can only say generally that this was sometime in May or June, unless you have a specific year of the 17th century in mind.
     
  7. dadane Senior Member

    New Zealand
    English (London/Essex)
    The may bank holiday in the UK is still referred to as Whitsun by older generations, even though it is now fixed to the conventional calendar. But, I agree, the term is dying out. I would love to continue this discussion but I fear it is beyond the scope of the forum.
     
  8. Allegro molto Senior Member

    Japanese
    Thank you very much, natkretep and dadane

    Please consider the following situation.

    A meeting was held in May this year. After the meeting, they said, "Let’s meet next year at Whitsuntide."

    Are they supposed to hold a meeting not on a definite date, but on some day(s) in May or June, i.e. not yet decided at the time of speaking?
     
  9. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    From Free Dictionary. I quote:

    Whit·sun·tide also Whit·sun Tide n.The week beginning on Whitsunday, especially the first three days of this week

    With regard to your sentence, Allegro:

    A meeting was held in May this year. After the meeting, they said, "Let’s meet next year at Whitsuntide."

    I agree that this means that no definite date had been established at the time of speaking. It was merely an indication of the period.;)


     

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