Avast, ye landlubbers

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by latsis, Dec 16, 2006.

  1. latsis New Member

    spanish, spain
    hello!!!

    anyone knows what does this phrase mean?
     
  2. ILT

    ILT Moderando con moderación

    México
    México - Español/Castellano
    Hi Latsis:

    Welcome to the forum. Could you please provide some context? Where did you read/hear it?

    Warm regards

    ILT
     
  3. latsis New Member

    spanish, spain
    Hi!

    I find it starting a lot of blog threads. I think it must be relate to pirates
     
  4. LizzieUSA

    LizzieUSA Senior Member

    Nebraska, USA
    USA, English
    Yes, it´s what the pirates in stories say. Haha!

    "Avast!" is a nautical term. It is a command to stop doing something ("Avast heaving!" means "Stop pulling on the rope.")

    "Ye" is an archaic form of "you".

    A "landlubber" is anyone who is not a sailor, and it's derrogative.

    So, to paraphrase, "Stop, you ignorant non-sailors!"

    I'm not sure how to even translate that to Spanish.
     
  5. latsis New Member

    spanish, spain
    Ok, thanks.
     
  6. mora Senior Member

    Canada, English
    Hello

    I do not believe that 'landlubber' is always derogatory. It could be used that way, such as when applied to an inexperienced sailor, but it simply means a person with little experience of the sea.

    Mora
     
  7. Calloway Senior Member

    Ingles
    its pretty much saying

    "look there,the people of the island"
     
  8. Layin Senior Member

    español, España
    Hello,
    I suppose that landlubbers is "land lovers". In spanish would be something like "marineros de agua dulce".

    So what means is some some sort of "stop, motherfuckers" but in nautical terms (the "ya" enfatizes -do you spell it like this- it, it's very typical of Scotland, for example... they put it before every fucking insult!;) )
     
  9. mora Senior Member

    Canada, English
    Hello Layin,

    You are correct that it is 'marineros de agua dulce', but you are not correct with respect to 'motherfuckers'. 'Landlubbers' does not mean this. "Motherfuckers' and 'fucking' are highly offensive words, despite how commonly some people use them. 'Landlubbers' is a coloquial word used by primarily by sailors that is not really an insult, unless directed at another sailor.

    Mora
     
  10. LizzieUSA

    LizzieUSA Senior Member

    Nebraska, USA
    USA, English
    Oh yeah, Mora is right. It's just someone who either works and lives on land or has very little experience as a sailor, and it is not necessarily derogatory. (I looked in a bigger dictionary, haha!) Still, in the context of the expression "Avast, ye landlubbers!", while not necessarily insulting, the term does imply a degree of ignorance on the part of the "landlubber", doesn't it? Anyway, instead of "motherfucker", which seems a LOT more abusive than "landlubber", how about this paraphrase:

    "Hold it, you idiots!"
    "Whoa, you dummies!"
    "Leave off, you morons!"

    and any combination thereof.

    Edited to add:

    "Ye" is an archaic (and informal) form of "you".
    "Ya" is a more modern (and informal) form of "you".
     
  11. LizzieUSA

    LizzieUSA Senior Member

    Nebraska, USA
    USA, English
    I bet it does come from "land lovers". I never thought about it before, but it makes sense.

     
  12. micafe

    micafe Senior Member

    United States
    Spanish - Colombia
    'Avast' is a nautical command to stop.

    'ye' is old English for 'you'.

    'Landlubber' is two words, landsman and lubber. Landsman is a person who lives on the land and knows very little or nothing about ships or the ocean and lubber is a very clumsy seaman.

    :)
     
  13. LizzieUSA

    LizzieUSA Senior Member

    Nebraska, USA
    USA, English
    Well, I went back to the original dictionary for etymology on "landlubber". It comes from "land" (ground; dirt) + "lubber" (a big, clumsy, stupid person; a lout). So I guess it's not "land lover". [Mirriam Webster Collegiate Dictionary 2002 edition]

    WR dictionary gives lout = gamberro

    My apologies if the following is too far off topic:

    I looked up "lout" in Mirriam Webster and "gamberro" in DRAE, and they don't seem to match that well.

    How about lout = zopenco ???? After looking up both in their respective dictionaries, it seems a better match of definition and tone, but what I don't know is whether "zopenco" is in common usage in Spanish.
     
  14. micafe

    micafe Senior Member

    United States
    Spanish - Colombia
    :( I lost all I had written!!! and it's not the first time it's happened to me!!!!:mad:

    WR dictionary gives lout = gamberro

    No, "gamberro" is not the word you want. It means something completely different, it a strong word that refers to someone who makes trouble, a vandal.

    How about lout = zopenco ???? After looking up both in their respective dictionaries, it seems a better match of definition and tone, but what I don't know is whether "zopenco" is in common usage in Spanish.

    "Zopenco" is used but the problem is, it doesn't mean the same as landlubber. It's a general word used to refer to someone who's stupid. Landlubber, on the other hand, seems to refer specifically to an inexperienced and clumsy sailor.

    There's an expression in Spanish "Marineros de agua dulce" but it doesn't have the intensity of the expression in English.

    There are other words in Spanish that mean stupid or clumsy: zoquete, mentecato, torpe. But as 'zopenco' they can refer to anyone.

    So I don't know what to advice you.

    I'm sorry I lost my last post, it seems to me it was much better.:(
     
  15. fenixpollo

    fenixpollo Mod Chicken

    Arizona
    American English
  16. Dutchable Junior Member

    Madrid
    Spain, Spanish
    Hello everyone.

    Maybe the landlubber term could be used in Spanish (related to sea vocabulary and with a little derogatory meaning, worse for sea-people than for land ones) 'grumetillo', cabinboy. Is not so strong like landlubber but I think it could fit better than 'marinero de agua dulce'.
     
  17. Nuharoo

    Nuharoo Senior Member

    Barcelona
    Spanish / Spain
    ¿Y cómo traduciríais «Avast, me hearties!», amigos?
    gracias
     
  18. Sub-Zero

    Sub-Zero Senior Member

    General Roca, Rio Negro
    Argentina-Argentine Spanish
    I've seen that expression in a Facebook game abot pirates. I think it means: ¡Hola, amigos! (I don't think that it's an order to stop doing something. Rather, I find it somewhat like a greeting to your friends.)
    Yarrr! Hope it helps. :D
     

Share This Page