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"Away from" in Finnish

Discussion in 'Suomi (Finnish)' started by binary_death, Jan 17, 2012.

  1. binary_death Junior Member

    Galicia, Spain
    Spanish, Catalan
    Hi all!

    I'd like to know how do you say "away from a place" in Finnish.
    "Kaukana" means "far", but I guess if that's the right word, it must go with its respective case.

    Thanks for helping :)
     
  2. Hakro

    Hakro Senior Member

    Helsinki, Finland
    Finnish - Finland
    Some more context would be not only useful but absolutely necessary.

    I would guess that the word you are looking for is "poissa".

    For example:
    - Olen poissa kotoa. I'm away from home / I'm not at home.
    - Olen ollut poissa Suomesta jo kymmenen vuotta. I've been away from Finland already for ten years.

    Please give some more context.
     
  3. binary_death Junior Member

    Galicia, Spain
    Spanish, Catalan
    Well, for example:

    "I lived in Finland some years ago, but now I'm away from that land."
    "I wish to go away from this place."

    In these contexts above, could you tell me which structure do I have to use, please?
     
  4. Hakro

    Hakro Senior Member

    Helsinki, Finland
    Finnish - Finland
    Note that when you are away you should use poissa and when you go away you should use pois, although in colloquial language people very often say olla pois jostakin.
     
  5. binary_death Junior Member

    Galicia, Spain
    Spanish, Catalan
    I think I undertand it.
    By the way, in fact poissa is the inesive of pois, right? Is there any reason for that?

    Finnish is a very beautiful language, but it's difficult as well =)
     
  6. Hakro

    Hakro Senior Member

    Helsinki, Finland
    Finnish - Finland
    I don't think it's inessive but I didn't find an explication. Maybe someone else here has a large grammar or etymology book.
     
  7. Finland Senior Member

    Finland
    finnois
    Hello!

    I have a (vague) recollection that "poissa" is the inessive of "poikki" (more or less in the meaning broken, thus separated). I'm not quite sure though and I don't have any of my reference books at hand. Maybe someone else finds more information with the help of this clue.

    HTH
    S
     
  8. Hakro

    Hakro Senior Member

    Helsinki, Finland
    Finnish - Finland
    Somewhere I found an extremely vague idea that poissa might be an example of the locative case that has disappeared from modern Finnish, it only exists in adverbs. The locative ending is usually -na (kotona, huomenna, ulkona) but in some cases it has changed, for example toissa päivänä (~ toisena päivänä). At least poissa rhymes with toissa.

    According to ISK (iso suomen kielioppi) poissa is just an adverb and its etymology is not explained.

    Grammar and etymology experts, please help us!
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2012
  9. binary_death Junior Member

    Galicia, Spain
    Spanish, Catalan
    I'm sorry, I was absent for a while.
    Look at this page: http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/poissa
    There's a table below with its declension.
    According to that, pois is the lative of poikki and poissa the inessive.

    Do you think it is trustable?
     
  10. DrWatson

    DrWatson Senior Member

    Finland (North)
    Finnish
    Well, pois and poissa have earlier been *poiɣes and *poiɣessa respectively (ɣ is a voiced velar fricative and used to be the "weaker" counterpart of k in consonant gradation). So maybe the poik- part is common for both poikki and poissa. The -i in the end of poikki is a lative suffix also found in adverbs like ohi 'past, over', kohti 'towards', katki 'broken', halki '(cut) in half' and läpi 'through'.
     

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