ayunas de 12 horas

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by marticc, Jun 22, 2011.

  1. marticc Senior Member

    Spain
    spanish
    Hola, quisiera saber como se traduciría esta frase:

    "Mañana ha de traer su perro a la consulta en ayunas de 12 horas para hacer la exploración física y el análisis de sangre."

    Mi intento sería:

    "Tomorrow you must bring your dog back to the practice fasting for the last twele hours so that we examine it and get its blood tested."

    Gracias y un saludo.
     
  2. aztlaniano

    aztlaniano Senior Member

    Lavapiestán, Madrid
    English (Aztlán, US sector)
    Bring your dog back tomorrow, without it/him/her having had anything to eat or drink for the previous twelve hours, so that we can do the physical examination and the blood tests.
     
  3. el_ochito Senior Member

    Caracas - Venezuela
    Spanish - Venezuelan
    También puedes utilizar la palabra "fast" que viene a ser exactamente lo mismo que ayunas, por eso el "Des-ayuno" se llama "Break-fast"

    Bring your dog to consult tomorrow, after fasting for 12 hours/after a 12-hour fast, to do the physical and run the blood tests.
     
  4. Masood Senior Member

    Leicester, England
    British English
    Hi
    I agree that ayuna means fast, but in the given context I think aztlaniano's version works very well.
     
  5. el_ochito Senior Member

    Caracas - Venezuela
    Spanish - Venezuelan
    Yes, Masood, I also agree that it works, I was just trying to give another alternative. Our friend Google gives almost a quarter-million hits for the whole phrase "12-hour fast", and all of the first few refer precisely to blood tests.
     
  6. Masood Senior Member

    Leicester, England
    British English
    Hi
    Do dogs fast, though? I don't think they do; their owners stop feeding them.

    Sólo mi opinión. A ver qué opinan los demás.
     
  7. The Prof

    The Prof Senior Member

    I can´t really imagine an English vet using the word "fast", either. He or she would almost certainly tell the owner not to give the animal anything to eat within a certain number of hours of the procedure.
    In fact, on the few occasions when I have been given such instructions myself, by a doctor, I don't remember them ever using the word 'fast' - not since I was a child, anyway! But this might be a British English thing.

    I wonder if, amongst themselves, our medical profession use the word 'fast'. My guess is that they do, but feel the need to dumb down for us patients. :(
     
  8. nangueyra Senior Member

    Buenos Aires, Argentina
    Castellano-Argentina
     
  9. el_ochito Senior Member

    Caracas - Venezuela
    Spanish - Venezuelan
    Masood, TheProf: I think I did miss the subtlety of "fasting" being a voluntary thing, and therefore something that couldn't be ascribed to dogs, as it isn't exactly them who have the will not to eat, but their owners who do not feed them. I'm in your camp now that I've seen that detail, but I do stand by my choice if we were talking about fellow humans.
     
  10. The Prof

    The Prof Senior Member

    As I said, this reluctance to use 'fast' is probably a British thing. Even here, it wouldn't be wrong to use the word when talking about people - it is just that not many people here would use it in the example in question.

    But in this type of context, we are perfectly happy to use it:
    Leeds University Amnesty Society are having a Darfur Awareness Day on 6th February. Part of the day includes a 24hour fast to raise awareness of the humanitarian crisis in Darfur. We will be wearing signs saying that we are fasting for Darfur ...
    http://www.justgiving.com/amnestyluudarfurfast
     
  11. aztlaniano

    aztlaniano Senior Member

    Lavapiestán, Madrid
    English (Aztlán, US sector)
    Buen ejemplo. Otro sería con algún contexto religioso, ej, "during the holy month of Ramadan, muslims fast during daylight hours".

    Un ejemplo del "no uso" de la palabra "fast": para recordar que un paciente en un hospital tiene que estar en ayunas se le coloca el letrero "nothing by mouth".
     
  12. The Prof

    The Prof Senior Member

    I think that in England, "nil by mouth" was the more usual version of that. These days, if you go by what you read in the press about the state of our National Health Service, this is no longer necessary because you are quite likely to be left without food anyway!!! :rolleyes:
     
  13. Masood Senior Member

    Leicester, England
    British English
    That's me; this year, the fasts fall more or less in August, so the days are pretty long.
     
  14. evitap Senior Member

    Spanish-Colombia
    Because of the season, or because you're not eating that day?
     

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