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backpacker

Discussion in 'Lingua Latina (Latin)' started by Casquilho, Jan 17, 2013.

  1. Casquilho Senior Member

    São Paulo, Brazil
    Portuguese - Brazil
    Here is a challenge, guys: how can I say "backpacker", following the structure of Latin? I know it will probably be modern Latin and it is ok.

    I mean "backpacker" as conjugating the ideas of "backpack" and "traveler"; I think viator or peregrinator translates the last, and I've found sacciperium as an approximated correspondence to "backpack".

    Can you help me?
     
  2. wandle

    wandle Senior Member

    London
    English - British
    The question really is, what do you want to say?
    mantica is a bag that was regularly carried on the back or over the shoulder.
    A traveller in the ancient would naturally have a bag, so that to speak of travelling with a bag on your back would be unnecessary as it would be understood.
     
  3. Ben Jamin Senior Member

    Norway
    Polish
    Viator pedester?
     
  4. Scholiast Senior Member

    Reading, UK
    English - UK
    sarcinifer?
     
  5. Casquilho Senior Member

    São Paulo, Brazil
    Portuguese - Brazil
    wandle, I would like to convey this idea: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Backpacking_(travel) - in Pt we say "mochileiro" and "mochilão" (from "mochila") for "backpacker" and "backpacking" respectively.
    If it's possible to construct a single word in Latin for that, all the better, I don't mind if it be a neologism.

    Scholiast, I like your sarcinifer, but what is the root?
     
  6. Scholiast Senior Member

    Reading, UK
    English - UK
    sarcina = (military - but not exclusively) baggage - shoulder-borne.

    -ifer as in signifer, crucifer,indeed Lucifer.
     
  7. Casquilho Senior Member

    São Paulo, Brazil
    Portuguese - Brazil
    Thank you! I think sarcinifer peregrinator express the idea.
     
  8. Scholiast Senior Member

    Reading, UK
    English - UK
    saluete et iterum!

    sarcinifer peregrinus might be a tad neater.

    Σ
     
  9. Casquilho Senior Member

    São Paulo, Brazil
    Portuguese - Brazil
    Thanks to all!
     
  10. Ben Jamin Senior Member

    Norway
    Polish
    I think that before starting a translation process one should decide what is the purpose of the translation. Do we want to translate the word as a sum of elements or as a meaning? Sarcinifer conveys the meaning of a person carrying a bag on the shoulders, but is this really the meaning of backpacker? Does it mean anybody that carries a burden on the shoulders? Are for instance the Sherpas carrying the luggage of tourists in Himalaya backpackers?
     
  11. wandle

    wandle Senior Member

    London
    English - British
    Well said, Ben Jamin. That is why I asked the question in post 2.
    It would help to have an English sentence containing 'backpacker' to show the intended meaning.
     
  12. Ben Jamin Senior Member

    Norway
    Polish
    I think that the essential meaning of a backpacker is a traveler that wants to travel using little money, usually at the expense of comfort. The traveler may or may not actually carry a backpack.
     

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