1. iheartL&O

    iheartL&O Senior Member

    Dominican Republic
    American English
    I'm looking for an expression in Spanish that means the same thing as "balls-out". Sort of like esmerarse, but more colloquial. ¿A alguien se le ocurre algo?
     
  2. Erik Rodrigo

    Erik Rodrigo New Member

    España, Castellano y Gallego
    Can you explain the context or situation? I can figure what it means but I'm not sure.
    "Dejarse los huevos" ¿?
    "Poner toda la carne en el asador" ¿?
     
  3. fenixpollo

    fenixpollo Mod Chicken

    Arizona
    American English
    Please give us a sample sentence every time you open a thread in this forum.
     
  4. iheartL&O

    iheartL&O Senior Member

    Dominican Republic
    American English
    Ok. Ok. Sorry. Here's the situation. A DA tells his assistant: "You don't have to go balls-out on this one, just make a deal."
    So I don't it refers to: esforzarse mucho, esmerarse, but I was looking for a colloquial expression in Spanish.
     
  5. Erik Rodrigo

    Erik Rodrigo New Member

    España, Castellano y Gallego
    "No tienes que dejarte la piel en ello, tan solo llega a un acuerdo" I suposse that the "make a deal" means about 'do your best'. So it could it be
    "No tienes que dejarte la piel en ello, siemplemente hazlo lo mejor que puedas"
    But the expression to make a deal is difficult for me.
     
  6. Lagartija

    Lagartija Senior Member

    Western Massachusetts
    English, USA
    Although I don't have more context than that one sentence, I would guess "Just make a deal" means "just get it done by making a deal with the defendant" The DA is a "District Attorney" and they often will make a deal (plea bargain) with the accused so that they do not have to take the case to trial. So the DA is telling his assistant not to work at collecting all the evidence it would take to complete the case in court, but to make a deal with the defense.
     
  7. fenixpollo

    fenixpollo Mod Chicken

    Arizona
    American English
    I agree with Lagartija's analysis. I would say something like "no te esfuerces demasiado".
     
  8. Erik Rodrigo

    Erik Rodrigo New Member

    España, Castellano y Gallego
    That's exactly what it means, but he asked for a colloquial expression, sorry if I misunderstood.
     
  9. fenixpollo

    fenixpollo Mod Chicken

    Arizona
    American English
    You didn't misunderstand. Since iheartL&O didn't provide us with an explanation of what the phrase means in the context that he gave us, Lagartija offered a clear explanation that I agree with. I should have stated that my proposed translation was formal, not the colloquial phrase that iheartL&O was looking for. Also, I'm not familiar with the phrase "dejarte la piel", so I'm not sure if it means the same thing as "go balls out". If it means the same thing as "esforzarte mucho", then todo está correcto. :)
     
  10. Moritzchen Senior Member

    Los Angeles, CA
    Spanish, USA
    Maybe no te rompas el culo could work.
     
  11. Carol_Thatter Senior Member

    Caballito, Buenos Aires - Argentina
    Castellano - Argentina
    Well Moritz, that's what you'd hear down here in Argentina ;)

    But if you don't want to say 'culo', you could also say 'no te rompas el alma', 'no te rompas/partas el lomo'
    (note 'partir' does not go with 'el alma' in this case, as that expression would have a different meaning).

    Hope it helps! :)
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2013
  12. fenixpollo

    fenixpollo Mod Chicken

    Arizona
    American English
    By the way, Carol, "balls out" is a vulgar expression (my understanding is that "balls" in this context means "testicles"), so Moritzchen's suggestion is a good one, in my opinion.
     
  13. Carol_Thatter Senior Member

    Caballito, Buenos Aires - Argentina
    Castellano - Argentina
    I completely agree with you fenixpollo. I just added a few suggestions that carry the same meaning without using a sort-of-swearword. Sometimes I prefer to avoid swearing in my 2nd language, as I'm never sure if the expression could be too offensive. But I agreed with Moritzchen's suggestion, it's actually quite common to hear in Argentina, but perhaps not so much in a working environment. ;)
     
  14. Lagartija

    Lagartija Senior Member

    Western Massachusetts
    English, USA
    In the US, the expression would be heard in a work environment among all men, but probably would not be heard in an office comprised of both men and women. ;-)
     
  15. maidinbedlam

    maidinbedlam Moderanged

    Vigo, Galicia
    Spanish - Spain
    "No te dejes los cuernos en ello", se diría por aquí.
     
  16. iheartL&O

    iheartL&O Senior Member

    Dominican Republic
    American English
    En RAE encontré
    romperse alguien los cuernos.
    1. loc. verb. coloq. Esforzarse, trabajar mucho.
    ¿Es muy común esta expresión?
     
  17. scotu Senior Member

    Paradise: LaX.Nay.Mex.
    Chicago English
    I don't think so:
     
  18. iheartL&O

    iheartL&O Senior Member

    Dominican Republic
    American English
    Hey, how about my question on "romperse los cuernos"?
     
  19. maidinbedlam

    maidinbedlam Moderanged

    Vigo, Galicia
    Spanish - Spain
    Sí, es común en España. No sé en otros países.
     
  20. iheartL&O

    iheartL&O Senior Member

    Dominican Republic
    American English
    Gracias, maidinbedlam.
     
  21. JeSuisSnob

    JeSuisSnob Moderator

    Mexico City
    Mexican Spanish
    Para mí, "no te esfuerces demasiado" queda perfectamente (es lo que se escucharía por acá).

    Un saludo.
     
  22. iheartL&O

    iheartL&O Senior Member

    Dominican Republic
    American English
    PIenso que asi queda demasiado 'normal' - Don't go balls out as una forma peculiar de decir no te esfuerces demasiado
    Para mi contexto quer
    ía algo diferente, porque luego otros dicen: "Como dice fulano 'don't go balls out' "

    Pero ciertamente esa traducción es acertada.
     

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