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Basta

Discussion in 'Tagalog and Filipino Languages' started by Seb_K, Nov 27, 2006.

  1. Seb_K Senior Member

    Malaysia
    English
    There were quite some occasions when I am chatting with a few of my friends online, they will use this phrase "basta". I know it's a vulgar word, but what exact meaning does it carry?

    :)
     
  2. Cracker Jack Senior Member

    It's not a vulgar word. It's used if you insist on a point or an idea and the others don't seem to agree with you. It's roughly ''I'm telling you.''

    X: Di naman kapanipaniwala yang sinasabi mo.
    Y: Bahala ka kung ayaw mo maniwala basta totoo yan.

    It can also be used to convey the idea that something is of no small or no mean caliber.

    X: Si xxxx palaban yan. Hindi yan basta-basta lang.
     
  3. Flaminius

    Flaminius coclea mod

    capita Iaponiae
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    The word basta does not strike me as indigenously Tagalog. Could it be traced back to Spanish basta?
     
  4. Thomas1

    Thomas1 Senior Member

    polszczyzna warszawska
    If I may chime in. :) We have the same word in Polish and the its roots have been traced back to Italian.


    Tom
     
  5. Cracker Jack Senior Member

    You are right, it is of Spanish origin. However in Tagalog, it is a false cognate. It does not mean sufficient or enough. In Southern part of the Philippines where many Spanish words are still part of the vocabulary, bastante is used to mean enough like in Spanish. In Tagalog however, it is non-existent.
     
  6. Tisia Senior Member

    Finland
    Iran, Persian, Kurdish, English, Finnish
    Hi

    Actually we also say that in both Persian and Kurdish. In Persian it is Basse and in Kurdish Bassa (in both cases a is pronounced as in band). It means "enough!"

    Tisia
     
  7. Seb_K Senior Member

    Malaysia
    English
    Alrighty, thanks for the explanation! Now, I truly understand what does it mean.

    :)
     
  8. DCPaco Senior Member

    Planet Earth
    Spanish of Mexico/ English of the USA
    It means enough in Spanish too...and sometimes we yell it out: Basta! And feels like it may be profane to a person who doesn't know its meaning.
     
  9. Ditas New Member

    USA
    Philippines
    *Some people also say it when someone presses them for a secret or details that they don't want to explain further.
    Anong binili mo para sa akin? (What did you buy for me?)
    Basta. Surpresa iyon. (---. That's a surprise.)

    *something beyond explanation
    Ah basta, nakakainis siya talaga. (---, that person is so annoying.)

    *as long as
    Basta't kasama kita. (As long as I'm with you.)

    Lots of usage depending on the context =)
     
  10. DCPaco Senior Member

    Planet Earth
    Spanish of Mexico/ English of the USA

    but they all use basta as enough, which is what it means.
     
  11. Ditas New Member

    USA
    Philippines
    Sorry I guess I didn't explain clearly. As Cracker Jack said in his post earlier, it is a false cognate and in Tagalog it doesn't mean enough as it is for other languages. It is used in a different way. He mentioned it is said when insisting a point.
    Example:
    Basta nakita ko siyang nagnanakaw! (I'm telling you, I saw him/her stealing!)

    *Some people also say it when someone presses them for a secret or details that they don't want to explain further.
    Anong binili mo para sa akin? (What did you buy for me?)
    Basta. Surpresa iyon. (---. That's a surprise.)
    Stop it, or enough, that's a suprise. -->'Enough/Stop it' is translated as 'Tama na' and would imply a different level of feeling than basta (Tagalog) and cannot be interchanged. If 'Tama na' was said here, it would be quite a startling remark & the person would think you're annoyed/ and can turn them off.

    *something beyond explanation
    Ah basta, nakakainis siya talaga. (---, that person is so annoying.)
    Oh enough of that, that person is so annoying. --> It's not exactly telling the person to absolutely stop talking about the subject. It wasn't a good example. Here's another:
    Person A: What's the matter?
    Person B: Basta parang may narinig akong kalabog sa ibaba. (--- I heard some noises downstairs.)

    *as long as
    Basta't kasama kita. (As long as I'm with you.)
    In Spanish we say: Contigo me basta.
    I am content with you (and the as long as is implicite)...but there is an implicite sense of sufficiency and feeling whole with the person, so again, it is enough.
    Another example:
    Basta't nag-aral ka ng mabuti, mangunguna ka sa pagsusulit.
    (As long as you studied very well, you can top the test.)

    Kapag nag-aral ka ng sapat, maipapasa mo ang pagsusulit.
    (If you studied enough, you can pass the test.)

    'Kapag nag-aral ka ng basta' wouldn't make sense =) Hope it's less confusing.
     
  12. rockjon Senior Member

    English
    I think the basta in the first two sentences above more or less are similar to the English "just."

    Basta. Surpresa iyon. It's just that it's a surprise.
    Ah basta, nakakainis siya talaga. Ah, it's just that person is so annoying.

    I'm actually not too sure but this is the only English equivalent word that makes sense in both sentences.
     
  13. niernier

    niernier Senior Member

    Manila, Philippines
    Bicol & Filipino
    I see. "just" is a different thing. It is translated to "lang" in tagalog.

    It's just that it's a surprise. => Surpresa lang 'yon.
    Ah, it's just that person is so annoying. => Nakakainis lang talaga siya.




    "Basta" offers many nuances. Not just one. So it cannot be translated to just one particular version. I agree that "enough of that/stop it" is on a different level. When we say basta we do not mean you to 'absolutely' stop talking about the matter or to stop on forcing us to talk.



    Basta. Sorpresa yon. * You can't make me talk * It's a surprise.

    Ah basta, nakakainis siya talaga. * I'm still by my opinion * That person is really annoying.

    Person A: What's the matter?
    Person B: Basta parang may narinig akong kalabog sa ibaba. (*I'm not certain but* I heard some noises downstairs.)


    One thing is assured. It can be transtalated to "as long as"
    Basta't kasama mo ako,... = As long as I'm with you,...
    Basta't nariyan ka,... = As long as you're there,...
    Basta't nag-aral ka ng mabuti,... = As long as you studied very well,...

    When duplicated, basta-basta (like what on Post#2 stated), is used to convey the idea that something is of no small caliber.



    The above is on how I understand "basta" in Tagalog. Because this word originated in Spanish, it does not mean the same thing. There are what we call false cognates so when speaking Tagalog, think in Tagalog. ;)
     
  14. Outsider Senior Member

    Portuguese (Portugal)
  15. Wacky... Senior Member

    Philippines
    Philippines-Tagalog
    The Tagalog "basta" can be translated as "just."

    Here are some imperative statements:
    • Basta, kunin mo na. = Just take it.
    • Basta dumating ka sa oras. = Just be on time.
    • Basta huwag kang umasta na parang bata. = Just don't be childish.
    • Basta. Surpresa iyon. = Just wait/be patient. It's a surprise
    And here are the declaratives: (Often used with "lang")
    • Basta na lang niya inagaw ang telepono. = He just grabbed the phone from me.
    • Basta lamang siya pumunta rito para guluhin ang lahat. = He just went here to ruin everything. (This ones not accurate)
    • Hindi ka maloloko nang basta gan'un-gan'on lang. You're not gonna get tricked just like that.
    • Hindi ito basta kinakain. You don't just eat this.
    • Hindi lang basta maganda, matalino pa. Not just/only pretty, but also intelligent.
    You can add lamang/lang to the imperative statements as well.
    However, it is true that just is translated as lamang but the thing is, lamang makes more sense when translated as "only." Eversince my gradeschool, I've always thought that just is one way to translate basta.

    By the way, the proper Tagalog word for enough is tama or husto. Husto came from the Spanish justo though I'm not sure if they were cognates.

    One more thing, in the phrase "mag-aral nang mabuti" nang cannot be spelled ng because it's used to signal the use of an adverb and not the possessive form of ang.
     
  16. niernier

    niernier Senior Member

    Manila, Philippines
    Bicol & Filipino

    :eek: I have not thought of that. Your examples prove that"basta" can be translated to "just". But then again, it has lots of usage and nuances depending on the situation it is used.


    A well-known situation where you can hear one say that is when you press a certain person to tell a secret.
    Basta. Sekreto yun. *I cannot tell you about it* It's a secret.


    The bottom line here is, "basta" does not translate to "stop it!/enough!" which is quite a startling remark to the listener.


    Thanks for the correction. I remember this as a lesson in grade school, about the short ng and the long nang. I got a lot of mistakes on that.:D
     

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