BCS ht(j)eti imperative

Discussion in 'Other Slavic Languages' started by Encolpius, Jan 12, 2013.

  1. Encolpius

    Encolpius Senior Member

    Prague
    Hungarian
    Hello, is there an imperative form of the that verb and is it used? Thanks.
     
  2. vianie Senior Member

    Slovak
    I'ld like to get to know how it seems also in the other Slavic languages.

    For the non-CS users:
    Czech chtít/chtět - chtěj!
    Slovak chcieť - chci!
     
  3. Duya Senior Member

    Not in WR world
    Whatever
    In BCS, the dictionary form is ht(j)edni. But it is virtually never used. A more natural form would be to use perfective aspect of synonymous verb (po)željeti>poželi.

    Tip: for similar questions, find a word in HJP and click on "Izvedeni oblici". Here's the URL for 'htjeti'
     
  4. Encolpius

    Encolpius Senior Member

    Prague
    Hungarian
    So is it possible to say: Ne poželi znati što me je pitao!
     
  5. Duya Senior Member

    Not in WR world
    Whatever
    Well, yes, it is grammatical, but not something realistically uttered. We'd rather use just a simple present, as in English: Ne želiš znati (da znaš) šta me je pitao 'You don't want to know what he asked me'.

    For poželi, I can quote you a God's commandment:

    Ne poželi žene bližnjeg svog.
     
  6. Encolpius

    Encolpius Senior Member

    Prague
    Hungarian
    OK, it just does not work in BSC. Ne želiš is no imperative. I was curious, ne želi (imperative) is possible, it is not. Hvala.
     
  7. Duya Senior Member

    Not in WR world
    Whatever
    It is technically possible, but it sounds a bit archaic: compare English "wish not": it's something one would expect in Bible, but not in everyday speech. Not that it's foreign, just a bit... stilted.

    However, a positive form, poželi, could fit better in a modern context. Still, when clock pointers overlap, we'd say circumlocution zamisli želju 'make a wish'.
     
  8. VelikiMag Senior Member

    Serbian - Montenegro
    Pay attention that this is in fact a negative imperative. In that case you must use an imperfective verb. An exception to this is the verb zaboraviti and few other set expressions. Thus, you can say for example: Ne želi drugima ono što ne želiš sebi.

    The most common way to express negative imperative are constructions using nemoj/nemojmo/nemojte. Both verbal aspects are then possible.
    Nemoj da želiš nemoguće - Don't wish the impossible.

    Sentences in past tense can also mean a prohibition: Da (slučajno) nisi poželio tako nešto! - Don't you dare to wish something like that!
     
  9. vianie Senior Member

    Slovak
    Although the imperatives of the Proto-Slavic xъtěti are admittedly not used much in any Slavic language, I just wonder how seem the nowadays forms of it. I found that the Russian one is: хотéть - хоти́!
     
  10. Duya Senior Member

    Not in WR world
    Whatever
    Thanks Mag, you summarized it nicely.

    Just a correction here, although Anicetus probably knows this better than you and me: "past tense"
    is a misnomer here. It is actually optative mood, which only takes the form of perfect. In negative form, it is actually a stronger command -- a threat, even -- than the imperative. (Thus, optative 'wishing' might be a misnomer too).
     

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