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Be thirsty/become th./want to drink

Discussion in 'All Languages' started by er targyn, Jun 18, 2013.

  1. er targyn Senior Member

    What is used in your language literally? The same with food: Be hungry/become h./want to eat.
     
  2. er targyn Senior Member

    In Russian usually is used "I want to drink" and "I became hungry".
     
  3. er targyn Senior Member

    In Kazakh - I became thirsty and I (my stomach/belly) became hungry.
     
  4. rusita preciosa

    rusita preciosa Modus forendi

    USA (Φιλαδέλφεια)
    Russian (Moscow)
    In French and Spanish it is
    to have thirst
    avoir soif
    tener sed

    or to have hunger
    avoir faim
    tener hambre
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2013
  5. er targyn Senior Member

    Wow, that's another option :)
     
  6. rusita preciosa

    rusita preciosa Modus forendi

    USA (Φιλαδέλφεια)
    Russian (Moscow)
    Just an addition: in Russian there are several ways to express hunger/thirst:

    я хочу пить (lit. I want to drink) - most common for I'm thirsty
    меня мучает жажда (lit. thirst is bothering/torturing me) - I'm very thirsty / I have been thirsty for a long time

    я хочу есть (lit. I want to eat) - most common
    мне есть хочется (lit. to me it wants to eat (concept similar to the Spanish "me gusto")) - a bit more colloquial
    я голоден (lit. I'm hungry) - slightly higher register
    я проголодался (lit. I hungered myself / I made myself hungry) - I became hungry
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2013
  7. er targyn Senior Member

    And "Я голодный".
     
  8. apmoy70 Senior Member

    Greek
    In Greek:

    The most common way to express thirst is «διψάω» [ði'psa.o] (1st person, Present indicative) --> I'm thirsty < Classical v. «διψάω/διψῶ» dĭpsáō (uncontracted) / dĭpsô (contracted) (Ionic «διψέω» dĭpséō (uncontracted)) --> to be thirsty, parched (with obscure etymology).
    The expression «θέλω νερό» ['θelo ne'ro] --> I want water is also used. The modern Greek neuter noun «νερό» [ne'ro] is the colloquial name of fresh water, since Byzantine times; a nominalized (stranded) adjective: «ὕδωρ νεαρόν» hýdōr nearón --> fresh water > «νεαρόν» nearón > «νερό».

    The most common way to express hunger, is «πεινάω» [pi'na.o] (1st person, Present indicative) --> I'm hungry < Classical v. «πεινάω/πεινῶ» peináō (uncontracted) / peinô (contracted) --> to hunger, be hungry (with obscure etymology).
     
  9. mataripis

    mataripis Senior Member

    Tagalog: 1,) Be hungry= magutom 2.) Be thirsty= Mauhaw 3.) want to eat= napapa kain
     
  10. AutumnOwl

    AutumnOwl Senior Member

    Sweden
    Swedish - Sweden, Finnish
    Swedish:
    vara hungrig - be hungry
    bli hungrig - become hungry
    känna hunger - feel hunger
    att hungra - to hunger (often used symbolically, att hungra efter kunskap - to hunger for knowledge)
    jag vill äta - I want to eat

    vara törstig - be thirsty
    bli törstig - to become thirsty
    känna törst - feel thirst
    att törsta - to thirst (often used symbolically, att törsta efter hämnd - to thirst for revenge)
    jag vill dricka - I want to drink
     
  11. rusita preciosa

    rusita preciosa Modus forendi

    USA (Φιλαδέλφεια)
    Russian (Moscow)
    In Russian there is a similar word голодать (lit. to hunger / to be hungering), it either means "to go hungry (in life/for a period of time)" or "not to eat on purpose"
     
  12. arielipi Senior Member

    Israel
    Hebrew
    Hebrew:
    hungry - רעב ra'ev
    thirsty - צמא tzame.
     
  13. ancalimon Senior Member

    Istanbul
    Turkish
    Turkish:

    become thirsty: susa (from su: water)
    become hungry: acık (from aç: hungry)
     
  14. er targyn Senior Member

    The same in Kazakh: suwsa- and acyq- (c=sh). Cölde- also means to get thirsty.
     
  15. ancalimon Senior Member

    Istanbul
    Turkish
    I guess both Turkish acık and Kazakh acyq comes from "aş : food" ?

    Also do you have any idea about the etymology of Cölde-?
     
  16. er targyn Senior Member

    Definitely not from food. Cölde is from cöl, that means thirst and also desert.
     
  17. ahmedcowon Senior Member

    Arabic:

    I'm thirsty - عطشان 'atshaan
    I'm hungry - جوعان jaw'aan
     
  18. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    Dutch:
    - Ik heb honger (ik ben hongerig is not impossible, but not common)
    - Ik heb dorst (ikben dorstig is quite uncommon)
     
  19. arielipi Senior Member

    Israel
    Hebrew
    in hebrew gove'a (starving) ligvo'a (to be starved; state, not action) sounds similar to hungry in arabic. is j here as in jar or as french j?
     
  20. ahmedcowon Senior Member

    jaw'aan also means starving in Arabic and j is as in jar (d͡ʒ) but in the Egyptian dialect we pronounce it as g like in hebrew.
     

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