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bitter, dark Lindt chocolate

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by Muri 22, Mar 19, 2012.

  1. Muri 22 Senior Member

    Argentina
    Spanish
    Hi everybody! I’m translating a novel about a woman of 32 that describes how difficult it is to accept her pregnancy, the relationship with her boyfriend, stepchildren of four and two, mother and friends, among other things. In this part, she describes the situation and atmosphere after the row she had with her boyfriend, and remebers good times, so it says like this: Our CDs were playing on the Boxster stereo and we sang along at the tops of our voices. I kept popping squares of bitter, dark Lindt chocolate into his mouth (although not into mine) and each time he sucked on my fingers.
    My attempt: Yo seguía poniéndole/le ponía cuadrados de chocolate Lindt negro y amargo/con sabor amargo en la boca (pero no en la mía) y cada vez que lo hacia (él) me chupaba los dedos.
    I’m not sure about whether I have translated “bitter, dark Lindt chocolate". I mean, according to the articles I read about Lindt chocolates, this one is dark chocolate with bitter taste, do you think is it ok my translation? I don’t want to get confused! Thanks in advance! Any suggestions are welcome!
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2012
  2. duvija

    duvija Senior Member

    Chicago
    Spanish - Uruguay
    In Spanish: chocolate amargo
    In English: dark chocolate (si dijera "bitter", nadie lo compraría. Cuestión de mercadeo).
    Yo pondría 'chocolate amargo Lindt'.
     
  3. macame

    macame Senior Member

    Half a mile to heaven
    Spanish & Galician
  4. mithrellas

    mithrellas Senior Member

    Barcelona
    Spanish & catalan - Catalonia (Spain)
    Los cuadrados de chocolate se llaman onzas:

    onza1. (Del lat. uncĭa).
    4. f. Cada una de las partes o porciones en que se divide una tableta de chocolate.

    Como macame, yo también diría chocolate negro.
    De todos modos, aunque el chocolate negro (sin leche) se sobreentiende que es amargo, añadiéndolo a la frase lo enfatizas.

    ...onzas de amargo chocolate negro Lindt.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2012
  5. duvija

    duvija Senior Member

    Chicago
    Spanish - Uruguay
    Uh, veo que la cosa va por regiones. ¿En toda España es 'chocolate negro'?
    Por mis pagos es 'chocolate amargo', pero ¿qué tal en toda Latinoamérica?
     
  6. mithrellas

    mithrellas Senior Member

    Barcelona
    Spanish & catalan - Catalonia (Spain)
    Diría que sí, que lo más común en España es chocolate negro. Algo menos también se oye chocolate sin leche o chocolate fondant (esto último más bien en las recetas de cocina).

    Chocolate amargo, se entendería y no es que no se pueda decir, pero no todo el chocolate negro es amargo. Su grado de amargor depende de la proporción de cacao que tenga.

    Si alguien me habla de chocolate amargo más bien pensaría que se refiere a eso, a la proporción de cacao (por lo menos 80% de cacao).
     
  7. borgonyon

    borgonyon Modus Vivendi

    Shreveport, Louisiana
    Mexican Spanish
    Lo que yo siempre he escuchado es chocolate amargo, no chocolate negro. Seguro la diferencia entre ambos lados del charco.
     
  8. macame

    macame Senior Member

    Half a mile to heaven
    Spanish & Galician
    En la propia página web de la marca en cuestión le llaman así.
     
  9. borgonyon

    borgonyon Modus Vivendi

    Shreveport, Louisiana
    Mexican Spanish
    Será en España, por lo que he visto, en las páginas en México que promueven los productos Lindt le llaman chocolate amargo.
     
  10. Muri 22 Senior Member

    Argentina
    Spanish
    Hi everybody!
    Yesterday I went to the supermarket and I had a look at some chocolate bars and in relation to this discussion, I found "chocolate amargo", not "chocolate negro amargo"; and with respect to sweet chocolates, "chocolate con leche". In the website of Lindt it says "dark chocolate", obviously, there exist different degrees of cocoa. We say "chocolate negro" when we want to make it clear that we are not refering to "chocolate blanco". I think I would translate it as "chocolate amargo Lindt".
    Thanks a lot all of you for your suggestions! They helped me to clear up this doubt!
     
  11. duvija

    duvija Senior Member

    Chicago
    Spanish - Uruguay
    Glad to have helped. 'Amargo', in theory, should be at least 65% cacao. But some brands use it for less than 50, which is a shame. Guillotine with them!
     

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